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I just considered using the new TDictionary type. But On QualityCentral I read about two memory leaks caused by TDictionary:

http://qc.codegear.com/wc/qcmain.aspx?d=67355

I just implemented the proposed workaround, basically subclassing TDictionary, overriding the destructor and manually freing the two objects that cause the leak:

destructor TMemCorrectedDictionary.Destroy;
begin
  Values.Free;
  Keys.Free;
  inherited;
end;

Problem is, since Values and Keys are read-only properties of TDictionary, I can't set them to nil. Well, just to be clear, everythings works fine now, but I wondered what would happen if CodeGear releases a patch for the leak and frees the two objects again in their own destructor. Wouldn't this cause an access violation?

Thanks in advance for reading (and hopefully answering).

share|improve this question
    
Thanks for the answer. Although I don't really like the ideo of relying on someone else setting all objects to nil after freeing them. Or am I being paranoid here? – jpfollenius Feb 4 '09 at 13:32
    
I know what you mean and agree. If I were you I would look at the source code again the time this problem is addressed in a hot fix or service pack - just to be sure. And I hope the fixes come soon because there are also other serious bugs in TDictionary that need to be fixed urgently. – Heinrich Ulbricht Feb 4 '09 at 13:43
    
Also please note that for the moment you should avoid using TDictionary due to a bug in its Clear method and its abysmal Add performance. See here for more details: alex.ciobanu.org/?p=59 – Mihai Limbășan Feb 4 '09 at 16:38
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could call inherited first and check if the properties are still set:

destructor TMemCorrectedDictionary.Destroy;
begin
  inherited;
  Values.Free;
  Keys.Free;
end;

And by the way: Free doesn't care if the instance to be freed is nil, so this will work if (but only if) inherited Destroy sets the properties to nil.

share|improve this answer
    
This is dangerous, as the inherited will have free'd the memory that you reference afterwards. Just .Free is fine as it automatically checks for nil. – mj2008 Feb 4 '09 at 15:26
    
I don't understand. The above code is only dangerous if CodeGear provides a fix which frees the variables Values and Keys and does NOT set them to nil afterwards. But it is the best you can do. It is definitely better than freeing them without setting them to nil and calling inherited afterwards. – Heinrich Ulbricht Feb 4 '09 at 15:47

I don't know how about previous versions of Delphi but in XE5 there is TObjectDictionary class that take care of freeing all the subitems.

share|improve this answer
    
As you can see in the QC item, the issue was resolved in build 12.0.3299.19016. That means Delphi 2009 users should check their used build (see tag of the question) and all users with newer versions should be fine. – sausagequeen Feb 27 '14 at 10:13

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