Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Specifically, I'm evaluating all of the images on a page to see if they have a certain attribute, and then adding some new <divs> to the DOM based on those attributes. Must I wait for document.ready to fire before performing these modifications in order to be guaranteed that Chrome has loaded all of the necessary pieces of the DOM?

The problem I'm running into is that sometimes document.ready takes a short while to fire and the user is already browsing around the page, wondering why my extension hasn't yet had any effect. The problem usually only lasts a moment, but it's enough to be annoying.

If I don't bother waiting for document.ready, and instead immediately process the document, everything seems to work; but I wonder if I'm just getting lucky.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Actually, you don't have to wait. You can process right away in Content Scripts. Just make sure you place document_end in the run_at attribute.

In document_end, the files are injected immediately after the DOM is complete, but before subresources like images and frames have loaded.

{
  "name": "My extension",
  ...
  "content_scripts": [
    {
      "matches": ["http://www.google.com/*"],
      "css": ["mystyles.css"],
      "js": ["jquery.js", "myscript.js"],
      "run_at": "document_end"
    }
  ],
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks, that exactly the information I was looking for. –  David Mills Feb 25 '11 at 18:31

Short answer: yes.

Long answer: jQuery won't be able to grab any DOM elements that aren't already rendered. I know i've gotten into trouble a few times and it can be quite annoying to debug something for awhile and then realize I forgot to wrap the code in a document.ready. If its working for you, it's because your lucky. Also, you dont need to wrap it in a document.ready if your scripts are at the bottom of your page, just above your closing body tag.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's a good point about scripts at the bottom of the page. Where/when are Chrome extension content scripts evaluated? –  David Mills Feb 25 '11 at 3:51
    
According to the Chrome Timeline (Developer Tools), the extensions are loaded last. So you very well may not have to use document.ready –  thinkdevcode Feb 25 '11 at 3:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.