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Is it legal to have code with multiple statements in the increment step of a for loop, as shown here?

for ( ... ; ... ; q++, t += expression)

When I try this out, the expression t += expression seems not have been executed, but when I put t += expression in the for loop body, it works fine.

For reference, here's my code:

The code looks like this:

for(/* irrelevant */; /* ... */; q++, t -= p[q][t])
{ /* do some dp... */}

// t do not change when I print it out.

Second version:

for(/* irrelevant */; /* ... */; q++)
{ 
  /* do some dp... */
  t -= p[q][t];
}

// t updates this time
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1  
What does your actual code look like? –  James McNellis Feb 25 '11 at 3:38
    
Appended above ... Have a look. –  user616677 Feb 26 '11 at 4:49

3 Answers 3

Yes, the code

for (/* .. */; /* .. */; q++, t += expression)

Is legal and should execute the code t += expression. This uses C's comma operator, a little-known operator that's pretty much used exclusively in this context. The comma operator works such that writing

A, B;

Where A and B are expressions, evaluates both A and B in order and then yields the value of B. So, for example, writing

int x = (1, 2);

Will give x the value 2, since it's the last term in the comma expression.

In the context of this for loop, when writing

q++, t += expression

The code will execute q++, then execute t += expression, and then the entire expression evaluates to the new value of t. However, since for loops discard the value of the third expression in the loop body, this value is not used anywhere.

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THX. But I'm still a little puzzled for the code after comma should still be executed according to what you say. But I got t unchanged in my for loop... –  user616677 Feb 26 '11 at 4:54
    
@user616677- Without more information I don't think I can help you diagnose the problem. All I know is that the statement will indeed be executed. Perhaps you're changing the value someplace else? –  templatetypedef Feb 26 '11 at 22:28

The code in the third part of the for(;;) executes after the loop body. Is that the problem?

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The order of evaluation is inversed in your 2 examples

for(/* irrelevant */; /* ... */; q++, t -= p[q][t])
{ /* do some dp... */}

// t do not change when I print it out.
}

will execute q++ before t -= p[q][t] so the successor of q will be used in the index.

for(/* irrelevant */; /* ... */; q++)
{ 
   /* do some dp... */
   t -= p[q][t]; 
}

In this case t -= p[q][t] will be executed before q++ the index q is not the same in your examples.

Your 2 expressions are not equivalent.

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lol.... I didn't notice that... Thank you very much.. –  user616677 Mar 4 '11 at 7:56

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