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i have an unsigned char which i need to convert to char before printf. So the example code goes like this:

   unsigned char y = sample.result;  
   char x = (char)y;  
   printf("%c \n", x);  

However, printf does not print x but if i use cout, x prints correctly.I have no idea why so. How to i convert a unsigned char variable to a char? Am i doing it wrong? reinterpret_casting is only for pointer and mine are not pointers. Thanks in advance.

EDIT: Command prompt returns me a smiley face "☺" for the value of sample.result which corresponds to unsigned char 1. And apparently netbeans is unable to print this smiley face. I have no idea how it got translated into a smiley face. Any help?

EDIT 2: I just realized you can't print char x = 1; in netbeans, and printing it in command prompt yields the smiley face. Reasons? :(

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2  
What you have compiles and works for me. What are you expecting to get, and what are you getting? –  GreenMatt Feb 25 '11 at 4:20
2  
Works for me too, with and without the cast. Do you happen to have a value higher than 127 in sample.result? –  Karl Bielefeldt Feb 25 '11 at 4:21
    
If you want to use an ugly cast (ugly in a good way! :), then I believe static_cast is what you are looking for. It probably won't solve your problem (which I believe has to do w/ Karl's comment), but is the closest cast for the job. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Feb 25 '11 at 4:37
    
"☺" this is the char value displayed when i run it in command prompt. Netbeans IDE shows nothing though. Any idea guys? –  f0rfun Feb 25 '11 at 5:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If char x = 1 and you want a 1 to be printed out, you need to use %d instead of %c in your format specifier. %c prints the ASCII representation of the number, which for 1 is an unprintable character called "start of heading."

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Try making x an int instead of char and see if that works. C rules required all char parameters to be converted to int, and printf is a C function.

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"C rules required all char parameters to be converted to int" What rule? –  stefan Feb 25 '11 at 4:50

The %c conversion for printf is only for characters in the basic character set. It seems you have an extended character that you want to print, so you'd have to use the appropriate tool for that. The type for that would be wchar_t and the print format %lc. But beware this depends a lot of your execution environment, locale settings and stuff like that.

And BTW in many circumstances narrow types like char are just converted to int or unsigned, so there is no need to cast it, and in fact other than your title suggests your problem has not much to do with casting.

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I'm not confident in this answer, but I just wrote a simple test program that compiles and prints the letter A without casting the unsigned char back to a char.

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
  unsigned char c = 'A';
  printf("%c\n",c);
  return 0;
}

Casting directly also worked:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
  unsigned char c = 'A';
  printf("%c\n",(char)c);
  return 0;
}

Doing it your way ALSO worked...

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
  unsigned char c = 'A';
  char d = (char)c;
  printf("%c\n",d);
  return 0;
}

So I assume I'm doing something wrong, now. Or maybe something else is your problem?

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Well the last code wont compile, so you must have a magic compiler ;-) –  stefan Feb 25 '11 at 4:50
    
Oops! Forgot the quote before %c. Fixed. –  theseankelly Feb 25 '11 at 12:58

Here the equation of conversion

the algorithm for char c to unsigned char uc.

return (c>127) ? (unsigned char)(-(256 + c)) : (unsigned char)c;

the algorithm for unsigned uc to char c.

return (uc < 0) ? (char)(256-(char)abs(uc)) : (char)uc;
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