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Why isn't sizeof for a struct equal to the sum of sizeof of each member?

#include<stdio.h>

struct csie {
  char c;
  short s;
  int i;
  double e;
};  

struct ceis {
  char c;
  double e;
  int i;
  short s;
};

int main(void) {
  printf("csie = %d\n", sizeof(struct csie));
  printf("ceis = %d\n", sizeof(struct ceis));
  return 0;
}

Output is:

csie = 16

ceis = 24

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marked as duplicate by Prasoon Saurav, Yasir Arsanukaev, Ben Voigt, corsiKa, mu is too short Feb 25 '11 at 5:42

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is very architecture dependent, and you don't specify what type of system you're on.

However, assuming

  • char: 1 byte size, no alignment
  • short: 2 byte size, aligned to 2 byte boundaries
  • int: 4 byte size, aligned to 4 byte boundaries
  • double: 8 byte size, aligned to 8 byte boundaries

this is easily explained.

+------+    +------+
| char |  0 | char |
+------+    +------+
|      |  1 |      |
+------+    |      |
|      |  2 |      |
| short|    |      |
|      |  3 |      |
+------+    |      |
|      |  4 |      |
|      |    |      |
|      |  5 |      |
|  int |    |      |
|      |  6 |      |
|      |    |      |
|      |  7 |      |
+------+    +------+
|      |  8 |      |
|      |    |      |
|      |  9 |      |
|      |    |      |
|      | 10 |      |
|      |    |      |
|      | 11 |      |
|double|    |double|
|      | 12 |      |
|      |    |      |
|      | 13 |      |
|      |    |      |
|      | 14 |      |
|      |    |      |
|      | 15 |      |
+------+    +------+
         16 |      |
            |      |
         17 |      |
            |  int |
         18 |      |
            |      |
         19 |      |
            +------+
         20 |      |
            | short|
         21 |      |
            +------+
         22 |      |
            |      |
         23 |      |
            +------+

There is empty space (called padding) in your structures, because certain data structures must fall on certain byte boundaries.

Note that the struct as a whole must be aligned to 8 byte boundaries to maintain the alignment of its members; that's why there's extra padding on the tail of the second version.

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The alignment of the structures are different.

The first structure:

struct csie {
  char c;  
  short s; // 3 bytes + 1 bytes of padding
  int i;   // 4 bytes
  double e; // 8 bytes
};  

struct ceis {
  char c; //1 byte + 7 bytes of padding
  double e; // 8 bytes
  int i; // 4 bytes
  short s; // 2 byte + 2 bytes of padding
};

In the first structure the char and the short can be packed into the same alignment block, while in the second struct they can't.

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1  
Right reason, wrong calculations. –  Ben Voigt Feb 25 '11 at 5:36
    
Your answer for csie makes sense. Your answer for ceis does not as you have total of 20 bytes and his output has 24? –  Pete Feb 25 '11 at 5:37
    
Yeah, I realized that short is 2 bytes after. I also forgot that doubles can be 8 byte aligned. –  GWW Feb 25 '11 at 5:37
4  
Totally dependent on arch and OS, so his calculations don't have to be perfect. It's demonstrative, not canonical –  Rafe Kettler Feb 25 '11 at 5:38

It almost certainly has something to do with alignment. Different types must be aligned differently in memory, and since the elements of one struct are in a different order than than the other, they are aligned differently.

How these differences play out vary greatly between architecture, OS and compiler. See the Wikipedia article and your OS/compiler's manual for more specific info.

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Many machines required that data types be aligned to appropriate boundaries in memory. In your case, it is probably that the CPU require doubles to be aligned to 8 byte boundaries.

So the char, short and int in the first structure only need to be padded by 1 byte while in the second struct 7 bytes of padding are required just between the char and the double.

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You're using a 64-bit machine. Thus all allocation is in 64-bit (8-byte) blocks. The double is 8 bytes and has to be in its own block. The other fields can share blocks.

Apparently the compiler isn't sophisticated enough to save space in the second version of your struct:

  • It allocates the first block for the char, thus wasting most of the block.
  • It allocates the second block for the double.
  • It allocates the third block for the int and the short.
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