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With the following code :

class TestsController < ApplicationController
  skip_before_filter :load_something,      # how to skip these only 
                     :load_something_else  # if the request is xhr ?

  def index
    respond_to do |format|
      format.html
      format.js
    end
  end

end

Is there a way to skip before filters depending if the request is a javascript call without changing the :load_something and :load_something_else methods ?

Thanks !

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possible duplicate of skip_before_filter ignores conditionals –  Jimmy Cuadra Feb 25 '11 at 7:49
    
@Jimmy Cuadra: that is not a solution to this problem. –  nathanvda Feb 25 '11 at 9:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

There used to be no clean solution to this. Assuming you do not have control over the before_filters (or do not want to change them), i would leave the skip_before_filter and add an extra before_filter that only executes the wanted methods if it is an xhr method.

So something like

skip_before_filter :load_something,      # how to skip these only 
                   :load_something_else  # if the request is xhr ?
before_filter :do_loads_if_xhr

def do_loads_if_xhr
  if request.xhr?
    load_something
    load_something_else
  end
end

The method described here only works because the conditional is global for the application: the conditional is only evaluated when the class is created. Not on each request.

[UPDATED] There is however, a cleaner way to make the skip_before_filter conditional. Write it like this:

skip_before_filter :load_something, :load_something_else, :if => proc {|c| request.xhr?}

Also note that while skip_before_filter is still completely supported, and not deprecated, since rails 4 the documentation seems to prefer the (identical) skip_before_action. Also the documentation is totally not clear about this, had to verify in code.

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Thanks, yes I think there is no cleaner solution than that. –  jrichardlai Feb 25 '11 at 15:05
    
Updated my almost three year old answer: there is now a better way :) –  nathanvda Dec 27 '13 at 11:44

Try this line to skip the filtering by a condition:

skip_before_filter :load_something, :load_something_else,
   :if => proc { request.xhr? }

For you can also do as follows:

skip_before_filter :load_something, :load_something_else,
   if: -> { request.xhr? }

or with an argument:

skip_before_filter :load_something, :load_something_else,
   if: ->(arg) { request.xhr? }
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Use alias_method_chain to decorate the filters, so they aren't executed if the request is xhr.

def load_something_with_noxhr(*args)
  load_something_without_noxhr(*args) unless request.xhr?
end

alias_method_chain :load_something, :noxhr

(change load_something into whatever needed, the _with_ and _without_ are literal, and the suffix noxhr must be the same you pass as second argument in the alias_method_chain call.)

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Looks like alias_method_chain might be deprecated / not recommended stackoverflow.com/questions/3689736/… –  colllin Jun 23 '14 at 8:22
1  
Not that it's not recommended, but now (Ruby 2.1) there is the marvellos prepend MyModule which puts your module in front of the call chain, so the funcion in the module can actually call super and call the same-named funcion in the "including" class. –  rewritten Jul 7 '14 at 1:19

You coded that filters? In that case you can write an if clause inside them without using skip_before_filter:

def load_something
  unless request.xhr?
    #Code
  end
end

In the other hand, you can make yout own filter and delegate:

before_filter :my_own_filter

def my_own_filter
  unless request.xhr?
    load_something
    load_something_else
  end
end

I think this should work.

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Shouldn't the methods be &&'d together so that if a previous one returns false then the others won't run and the filter chain will be halted? –  Brendon Muir Oct 4 '11 at 1:30

All of these answers take the wrong approach in my opinion. Using a skip_before_action with a condition is doing it backwards, and isn't as explicit and clear as adding the condition to the before_action itself; so this is my proposal:

before_action :require_password_change, unless: -> { request.xhr? }

This way, to someone reading your code it's immediately clear under what conditions this before_action runs or doesn't run, without having to rely on them happening across this skip_before_action somewhere in the controller hierarchy.

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