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Having an event like this:

class ABC
{
delegate bool X (int a);
event X eventX;
}

ABC.eventX+=someMethod; //works

I assume the delegate is then created implicitly by compiler?

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2 Answers 2

Yes, prior to .NET 2 you had to manually specify it:

ABC.eventX+=new X(someMethod);

But it is now created implicitly with this syntax:

ABC.eventX+=someMethod;
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You may wish to mention that this is called a method group conversion, in case the OP wants to find out more. –  Jon Skeet Feb 25 '11 at 7:57

Yes, it's automatically created.

For example:


namespace ConsoleApplication5
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            (new Program()).Entrance();
        }

        public void Entrance()
        {
            ABC a = new ABC();
            a.eventX += callback;
        }

        protected bool callback(int a)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

    class ABC
    {
        public delegate bool X(int a);
        public event X eventX;
    }
}

The Program class will be this if you see in reflector:


internal class Program
{
    // Methods
    protected bool callback(int a)
    {
        return true;
    }

    public void Entrance()
    {
        ABC a = new ABC();
        a.eventX += new ABC.X(this.callback);
    }

    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        new Program().Entrance();
    }
}



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