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I have a pretty simple profile page where users can upload images and videos. I have implemented my own role system and I'm not using .NET (I wanted to learn and builded my own). I'll have 10´000 users at the most and about 50-100 users simultaneously using it.

I have three tables in the DB that handles my RBAC:

Roles: Admin, User, Manager, Guest
Permissions: SendEmail, AdvancedSearch, RemoveUser... etc.

Authorized: In this table I map a role to a permission. I run a check every time a permission is required for an action. If the permission<->role is in the table I return true and the action is authorized.

So, here's a few questions on this scenario.

  • Is this a light weight way to check authorization? By quering the DB on every page load and action the user makes.
  • Should I keep this in an XML-file for faster result?
  • Is there a better structure for this sort of RBAC?

Thanks in advance!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For 50-100 users, I would just cache something per-active-user in the app. This avoids any small overhead from a db fetch, except for when it expires. So just have some small object that you can cache cheaply, but which includes all the user information you need to run the app's core functions.

Ther's nothing stopping you using this to implement an IPrincipal to use the inbuilt [PrincipalPermission(...)] stuff, but doing it yourself works too.

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"except for when it expires"...that's why I didn't do it in the first place. But if this becomes the most popular answer I'll reconcider =) –  Niklas Feb 25 '11 at 10:11
    
@Niklas - querying once every few minutes is a lot better than querying every request... –  Marc Gravell Feb 25 '11 at 10:20
    
So just to get this clear. When a user logs in I create a session variable storing every "permission" that user is allowed to make based on its' role. Like an array with strings? –  Niklas Feb 25 '11 at 10:26
    
@Niklas - not quite when they log on; rather, whenever you check the cache (based on however you handle identity) and it isn't there: create it and cache it. –  Marc Gravell Feb 25 '11 at 10:30
    
Last one, then I'll stop bothering :P Could you give me a link on how to check the cache like you said. Also, I'm using User.Identity.Name already so a link on how to extend that to using roles =) Big thanks! –  Niklas Feb 25 '11 at 12:08

Below are the answers to your questions.

• Is this a light weight way to check authorization? By quering the DB on every page load and action the user makes.

Ans. I would apply configurable caching system layer on database, and use this cache system for authorizations with customizable expiration time.

• Should I keep this in an XML-file for faster result?

Ans. I would not prefer xml file, instead use serialization.

• Is there a better structure for this sort of RBAC?

Ans. As far as the structure of the DB and RBAC is concerned, it should be secure enough that, access controls or permissions for applications cannot be directly tempered from DB. This article shows some very helpful guidelines and concepts when designing RBAC.

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