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This is program I am writing. I am getting a StackOverFlowError exception when I run it:

public class maininherit {

   maininherit h = new maininherit() {

        @Override
        public void mai() {
            System.out.print("inner");
        }
    };

    public static void main(String[] args){
       maininherit t=new maininherit();
       t.mai();
    }

    public void mai(){
       System.out.print("hellllll");
       h.mai();
    }
  }

Here I am getting StackOverflowErrors only when I am using maininherit class as a reference in the inner class. If I am using other classes I am not getting that error. Can anyone clarify this to me?

Sorry i am thank full for your answers but i had a doubt i don't know whether reasonable or not only repetition of initializations can be possible only when i created instance in constructor of that same class know.then how it is possible to have multiple initializations?

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2  
Wow that's a very partcular class. You did it in a learning process? –  reef Feb 25 '11 at 9:47
    
yes...i am preparing to write scjp.by trying different ways to implement inner classes i came with this –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 9:50
    
ok you're trying to write stranger code as the one the guys from the scjp exam do ;) –  reef Feb 25 '11 at 9:53
    
awesome..wierd !_! –  Suraj Chandran Feb 25 '11 at 10:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This line:

maininherit t=new maininherit();

Creates a new maininherit object (I'll call it m0), which has a field of the same type (I'll call that m1)

When m0 is created, m1 is initialized. m1 also has a field, so m2 is initialized. m2 also has a field so m3 is initialized etc.

This would go on forever if the StackOverflowError didn't oocur

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..yeah i understood what u said but when m0 is initialized u told m1 is initialized that can happend only when we are declaring m1 in constructor know? –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 10:16
    
@satheesh no, the compiler moves field initializations into the constructor (if you don't specify a constructor, the compiler creates one for you) –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 25 '11 at 10:21
    
i created constructor and tried even than i am getting error –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 10:29
    
@satheesh yes, as I said: field initializations are copied into your constructor by the compiler. There's no way for you to stop that. Your design is flawed –  Sean Patrick Floyd Feb 25 '11 at 10:33
    
okay sir i understood i thought if we are going to define constructor field intialization copying will be prevented –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 10:36

Implementation of your inner class is just override part of maininherit class. So... You init class maininherit then variable h were initialized. New operator were called and then... inner class init maininherit again and need to set h variable.

Your code is infinitive loop of initializations h variable.

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+1 Yes you're right the problem comes in the init process of the class. –  reef Feb 25 '11 at 9:51
    
@satheesh, because in that case you don't create the same class instance recursively. If the hello class was creating more hello instances when initializing, then it would lead to the same error. –  Sergey Tachenov Feb 25 '11 at 10:01
    
ok sir fine i understood –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 10:02

The issue here is not with your main and mai functions, but with your initialization of the maininherit h member variable. The problem is that each instance of maininherit is creating a maininherit object (which in turn, creates a maininherit object, etc.). Marking that as a static member will cause a single copy to be shared by all instances, which will solve this issue.

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In other words: each time you create a maininherit object, you also create another maininherit. –  Joachim Sauer Feb 25 '11 at 9:53
    
Exactly. I see that brevity might not be my strong point. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Feb 25 '11 at 9:53

Stackoverflow error will occur whenever you try to create instance of same class as a member variable. So h instance is created infinite times and hence stackoverflow error came.

For e.g. the code you gave, even without inner class it will throw stackoverflow error

public class maininherit {

maininherit h=new maininherit();


public static void main(String[] args){
   maininherit t=new maininherit();
   t.mai();
 }

public void mai(){
    System.out.print("hellllll");
    h.mai();
}}

Avoid creating object of the class itself as a member or field

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