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I am to implement an algorithm where the way I thought it out on paper is slightly different from the pseudo-code suggested in our text book. I am trying to convince myself that the 2 snippets of pseudo below will do the same thing without any major difference in order of time complexity when having to implement the 'contains' and generation of all subsets in respectively Two and One below. I am having trouble coming up with something rigorous that will convince me.

T and A are sets of subsets of a finite set I. No set or subset is empty and every set has a "field" called 'count'.

Snippet One:

For-each t in T do {
  A_t = A intersected with the set of all non-empty subsets of t
  For-each a in A_t do {
    a.count++
  }
}

Snippet Two:

For-each a in A do {
  a.count = count(a, T)
}

Here count is defined by

count(a, T) {
  c = 0
  For-each t in T do {
    if (t contains a) {
      c++
    }
return c
}
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What does the contains function do? Return true if t is a subset of a? –  dfb Feb 25 '11 at 18:43
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1 Answer

It depends on how you implement your subset generation and contains function. My guess is that in most cases, generating all those subsets is not worth it and (as a is in A_t iff a is in A and in the set of subsets of t, i.e. a is in A_t iff a is in A and t contains a) you can just rewrite your first snippet to

For-each t in T do {
  For-each a in A do {
    if (t contains a){
      a.count++
    }
  }
}

while your second snippet is

For-each a in A do {
  For-each t in T do {
    if (t contains a){
      a.count++
    }
  }
}

(in both cases assuming that for all a in A, a.count is initially set to 0)

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