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I am simulating the IEEE802.11b PHY Model. I am building the header of the Packet in the Physical Layer.

As per the Literature

The PLCP LENGTH field shall be an unsigned 16-bit integer that indicates the number of microseconds to transmit the PPDU.

If I assume the packet size to be 1024Bytes, what should be the value of the Length field(16 bit wide)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The calculation of the LENGTH field depends on the number of bytes to send, as well as on the data rate (5.5 or 11 Mbps). The basic idea of the calculation is:

                        Bytes * 8
LENGTH = Time (µs) = ----------------
                     Data rate (Mbps)

However, you need to read Section 18.2.3.5, Long PLCP LENGTH field in the 802.11b-1999 Standard, pages 15-17. It has the complete details of how to calculate this value, along with several examples. It unambiguously explains how to properly round the data, as well as when the length extension bit in the SERVICE field should be set.

I will not reproduce the text of the section here since it looks like IEEE might be strict about enforcing their copyright. However, if you don't have the standard already, I suggest you download it now from the link above -- it's free!

If you have any questions about interpreting the standard, don't hesitate to ask.

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Thanks a Lot for your help. I will have a look. But I got an idea how to set the LENGTH field. –  Kiran Feb 25 '11 at 17:49
    
As far as I can tell, 5.5 and 11 Mbps are the only allowed data rates for 802.11b. See the table on en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11 –  Justin Feb 25 '11 at 18:53
    
Thanks, I was wrong. I had an impression that even 1Mbps and 2Mbps is part of 802.11b Standard. –  Kiran Feb 25 '11 at 19:04

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