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I know how to do this in php with date() and mktime() functions, but have no idea how to accomplish the same thing in javascript...

function incr_date(date_str){
    //...magic here
    return next_date_str;
}

var date_str = '2011-02-28';
console.log( incr_date(date_str) ); //want to output "2011-03-01"

is this even possible with js?

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go to stackoverflow.com/a/8295943/792103 for answer – jalil Nov 28 '11 at 12:42
up vote 8 down vote accepted

First you parse it, then you use dt.setDate(dt.getDate() + 1). You'll have to parse it manually, though, or using DateJS or similar; that format is not yet supported across all major browsers (new Date(date_str) will not work reliably cross-browser; see note below). And then convert it back to your format.

Something along these lines:

function incr_date(date_str){
  var parts = date_str.split("-");
  var dt = new Date(
    parseInt(parts[0], 10),      // year
    parseInt(parts[1], 10) - 1,  // month (starts with 0)
    parseInt(parts[2], 10)       // date
  );
  dt.setDate(dt.getDate() + 1);
  parts[0] = "" + dt.getFullYear();
  parts[1] = "" + (dt.getMonth() + 1);
  if (parts[1].length < 2) {
    parts[1] = "0" + parts[1];
  }
  parts[2] = "" + dt.getDate();
  if (parts[2].length < 2) {
    parts[2] = "0" + parts[2];
  }
  return parts.join("-");
}

Live example

Note that setDate will correctly handle rolling over to the next month (and year if necessary).

Live example

The above is tested and works on IE6, IE7, IE8; Chrome, Opera, and Firefox on Linux; Chrome, Opera, Firefox, and Safari on Windows.

A note about support for this format in JavaScript: The new Date(string) constructor in JavaScript only recently had the formats that it would accept standardized, as of ECMAScript 5th edition released in December 2009. Your format will be supported when browsers support it, but as of this writing, no released version of IE (not even IE8) supports it. Other recent browsers mostly do.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you claiming that the standard Date object constructor is not implemented consistently across browers? – Andrea Feb 25 '11 at 11:37
    
@Andrea: Yes, the version of the Date constructor he'd need is not reliably supported yet. There was no standard format for new Date(string) prior to the 5th edition specification, which was only released about 14 months ago. Try it in any currently-released version of IE (including IE8): jsbin.com/omoka4 – T.J. Crowder Feb 25 '11 at 11:47
    
Oh, I see. I thought that ES3 would go as far as defining a few standard formats which would need to be accepted by the Date constructor. – Andrea Feb 25 '11 at 11:50
    
@Andrea: Nope. All ES3 says is that it must accept whatever Date#toString spits out, and it doesn't define that, either. :-) – T.J. Crowder Feb 25 '11 at 11:57
    
is this to get "01" instead of "1" for the first of the month? – Haroldo Feb 25 '11 at 12:00

If you are using jQuery & jQuery UI then use the following:

var dt = $.datepicker.parseDate('yy-mm-dd', '2011-02-25');
dt.setDate(dt.getDate() + 1)
var dtNew = $.datepicker.formatDate('yy-mm-dd', dt);

You can parse and format any way you want, and most importantly you will not need a new function in your JS Library.

share|improve this answer

First you need to turn your date string into a Date object.

var date = new Date('2011-02-28');

Then you need to add one to the day part of the date.

date.setDate(d.getDate() + 1);

Although this looks it might end up with the 29th of February, it won't and will give you the 1st March.

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2  
"var date = new Date('2011-02-28');" Doesn't work in any currently-released version of IE (including IE8). – T.J. Crowder Feb 25 '11 at 11:51
    
Yeah, because 2011 isn't a leap year. – nyuszika7h Feb 25 '11 at 11:56
    
@Nyuszika7H: Leap years don't come into it (February always has a 28th). It's the format that is new (only standardized 14 months ago) and not widely-supported yet. If you're talking about date.setDate(d.getDate() + 1), JavaScript handles rolling the month (and year, if necessary) for you. – T.J. Crowder Feb 25 '11 at 11:58

I would use date.js from here - http://www.datejs.com/

Has lots of functions for handling this kind of thing.

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I modified this excellent answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/5116693/4021614 to handle both incrementing and decrementing by any amount (using this method http://stackoverflow.com/a/25114400/4021614).

function incrementDate(date_str, incrementor) {
    var parts = date_str.split("-");
    var dt = new Date(
        parseInt(parts[0], 10),      // year
        parseInt(parts[1], 10) - 1,  // month (starts with 0)
        parseInt(parts[2], 10)       // date
    );
    dt.setTime(dt.getTime() + incrementor * 86400000);
    parts[0] = "" + dt.getFullYear();
    parts[1] = "" + (dt.getMonth() + 1);
    if (parts[1].length < 2) {
        parts[1] = "0" + parts[1];
    }
    parts[2] = "" + dt.getDate();
    if (parts[2].length < 2) {
        parts[2] = "0" + parts[2];
    }
    return parts.join("-");
};

example:

//increment by 7 days
incrementDate('2015-01-01', 7);
//returns '2015-01-08'

//decrement by 1 day
incrementDate('2015-01-01', -1);
//returns '2014-12-31'
share|improve this answer

Yes. First you read the date and you convert to a date object, then you add 1 day and return the result

function incrementDate(date_str) {
    var date = new Date(date_str);
    date.setDate(date.getDate() + 1);
    return date.getFullYear() + '-' + date.getMonth() + '-' + date.getDate();
}

The Date object, which is native in javascript, takes care of all problems arising from leap years and so on.

share|improve this answer
1  
subtract a day?? – Jamiec Feb 25 '11 at 11:33
    
Sorry, it was add one day, I edited it. – Andrea Feb 25 '11 at 11:35
    
new Date("2011-02-28") doesn't work in any current version of IE. And you've dropped the zero-padding on his result string. – T.J. Crowder Feb 25 '11 at 11:46
    
Uhm... I did not know that IE lacked support even for native objects constructors... :-( There is always something to learn about IE deficiencies! – Andrea Feb 25 '11 at 11:48
    
@Andrea: The key point is that having a standard format for new Date(string) is new. JavaScript didn't have a standard format for that until 14 months ago. (That doesn't justify IE8 still not supporting it, but it rather forgives IE6 and IE7.) – T.J. Crowder Feb 25 '11 at 11:49

i hope this will help

function incr_date(date_str,no_of_days_to_add){
 var futureDate=new Date(date_str);

  futureDate.setDate(new Date().getDate()+no_of_days_to_add);
  var next_date_str= futureDate;

    return next_date_str;
}
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