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In bash

echo ${!X*}

will print all the names of the variables whose name starts with 'X'.
Is it possible to get the same with an arbitrary pattern, e.g. get all the names of the variables whose name contains an 'X' in any position?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Use the builtin command compgen:

compgen -A variable | grep X
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2  
(+1) This works with local variables as well. This compgen has been today's revelation - I think I should study all bash builtins... –  Paolo Tedesco Feb 4 '09 at 16:44

This will search for X only in variable names and output only matching variable names:

set | grep -oP '^\w*X\w*(?==)'

or for easier editing of searched pattern

set | grep -oP '^\w*(?==)' | grep X

or simply (maybe more easy to remember)

set | cut -d= -f1 | grep X

If you want to match X inside variable names, but output in name=value form, then:

set | grep -P '^\w*X\w*(?==)'

and if you want to match X inside variable names, but output only value, then:

set | grep -P '^\w*X\w*(?==)' | grep -oP '(?<==).*'
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This should do it:

env | grep ".*X.*"

Edit: sorry, that looks for X in the value too. This version only looks for X in the var name

env | awk -F "=" '{print $1}' | grep ".*X.*"

As Paul points out in the comments, if you're looking for local variables too, env needs to be replaced with set:

set | awk -F "=" '{print $1}' | grep ".*X.*"
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1  
Only gets environment variables, not local ones. Although using "set" instead of "env" might work. –  Paul Tomblin Feb 4 '09 at 15:07
    
Thanks, I didn't know about set, I usually "export" any vars I'm interested in so I only use env. –  diciu Feb 4 '09 at 15:13
1  
set also print out function, not only local variables and environment variables –  zhaorufei Oct 22 '10 at 1:43
1  
Use (set -o posix ; set) instead, that'll remove the functions from the list. –  The Doctor What Nov 1 '10 at 20:06
env | awk -F= '{if($1 ~ /X/) print $1}'
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Easiest might be to do a

printenv |grep D.*=

The only difference is it also prints out the variable's values.

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