Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

When indenting long if conditions, you usually do something like this (actually, PyDev indents like that):

if (collResv.repeatability is None or
    collResv.somethingElse):
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()

However, this puts the block started by the if statement on the same indentation level as the last part of the if condition which makes it very ugly/hard to read in my opinion as you don't immediately see where the block starts.

Some other styles I thought about:

if (collResv.repeatability is None or
        collResv.somethingElse):
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()

This looks pretty inconsistent as the second line is indented much more than the first line but it's readable.

if (collResv.repeatability is None or
  collResv.somethingElse):
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()

This is also more readable than the first example, but the indentation is not a multiple of 4 anymore and besides that it looks wrong as the second line has less indentation than the beginning of the condition in the first line.


So, my main question is: Is there a suggested indentation style for cases like that which do not require overly-long lines (i.e. a single-line condition)? If not, what do you prefer for cases like that?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Chronial, plaes, TemplateRex, Frank Schmitt, Burhan Khalid Apr 24 '13 at 9:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Why isn't there a method on collResv to do the test? The fact that you have to do a compound condition on something that isn't self may indicate you need to refactor. Likewise why doesn't a method called rejectCompletely() also set the rejected attribute on the object? –  Duncan Feb 25 '11 at 13:11
    
Actually that was just an example. there is no method with that name - i just wanted something sounding a bit sensible to have more than one line in the body. –  ThiefMaster Feb 25 '11 at 14:02

9 Answers 9

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is an indirect answer--not answering the style question directly, but it's the practical answer in general, so it's worth mentioning.

I find it extremely rare to need to write multi-line conditionals. There are two factors to this:

  • Don't wrap code at 80 columns. PEP-8's advice on this subject is ancient and harmful; we're well past the days of 80x25 terminals and editors that can't sensibly handle wrapping. 100 columns is fine, and 120 is usually acceptable, too.
  • If conditions become so long that they still need to wrap, it's usually reasonable to move some of the logic out of the conditional and into a separate expression. This also tends to help readability.

Grepping through my recent projects, around 12kloc, there's only one conditional long enough that it needed to be wrapped; the issue simply very rarely arises. If you do need to do this, then as nosklo says, indent it separately--as you noticed, indenting it to the same level as the block beneath it is confusing and hard to read.

share|improve this answer
14  
Generally I agree, though there are still good reasons to stick to 80 columns (eyes prefer text with a limited width; possibility to work with multiple files side-by-side). –  Oben Sonne Feb 25 '11 at 13:26
    
@Oben: That's a formatting principle for paragraphs, not code. When you wrap English paragraphs at a certain width, every line is around that width; this makes wide formatting hard to read because your eyes are constantly scanning the whole width. By contrast, when you wrap code at 120 columns, most lines are much shorter; there are just a few isolated lines which are longer. The readability issues associated with too-wide paragraphs don't occur. –  Glenn Maynard Feb 25 '11 at 13:49
    
I don't find the "side-by-side" case interesting--two 80-column editors don't even fit on my 24" monitor at a comfortable font size, and in any case wrapping at 80 columns uglifies code so badly it's just not worth it. People can live with a bit of editor wrapping if they're in that configuration, rather than expecting everyone else to squish their code. –  Glenn Maynard Feb 25 '11 at 13:59
3  
I don't want to know your font size... ;) –  ThiefMaster Feb 25 '11 at 14:03
2  
As soon as one dev uses superlong lines - thinking that 200-char lines or whatever don't have to wrap on today's screens - some other developer now can't put three windows side-by-side on a monitor and see reasonably formatted code. More than 80 cols is essentially the same as inflicting unwrapped code on other devs - it has nothing to do with prose text. Just because a given author can't put two 80 column editors side by side doesn't mean no one else will want to (although some devs needing a large font size to read easily is a good argument against long functions... AND long lines) –  Alex North-Keys Apr 2 at 22:00

Often I work around this problem by calculating the condition in an own statement:

condition = (collResv.repeatability is None or
             collResv.somethingElse)
if condition:
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()

Though, for a still relatively short condition as in your specific example I'd go for nosklo's solution - the extra statement used here is more suited for even longer conditional expressions.

share|improve this answer
    
I think that code makes things less readable. There's really a variable just to avoid a multi-line if?! –  David Ehrmann Nov 11 '13 at 19:51
    
The readability of this approach depends -- as often -- on your particular situation and of course is highly subjective. Besides that, I wouldn't care about the extra variable issue. After all that's what variables are there for: use short names for more complex things. Extra bonus: when debugging your code, some "redundant" variables come in handy. –  Oben Sonne Nov 29 '13 at 21:17

This is what I do:

if (collResv.repeatability is None or
        collResv.somethingElse):
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()
share|improve this answer

One problem with all previous suggestions here is that the logical operators for the subsequent conditions are put on the preceding line. Imo, that makes it less readable.

I recommend putting the logical operator on the same line as the condition it appends to the if statement.

This in my opinion, is better

if (None == foo
        and None == bar
        or None == foo_bar):

than this:

if (None == foo and
        None == bar or
        None == foo_bar):
share|improve this answer

In such a case, I would simply do:

if (collResv.repeatability is None or
    collResv.somethingElse):
    # do:
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()
share|improve this answer

Pep-8 recommends the way you indented your original example.

Now if you're willing to fly in the face of the oh so sacred of style guides :-) you could move the operator to the next line:

if (collResv.repeatability is None
    or collResv.somethingElse):
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()

I'm not really a fan of this, I actually find your original syntax fairly easy to read and wouldn't spend much time monkeying with the indentation or line breaks.

share|improve this answer

I would do it this way. Keep it indented far away not to get confused.

if (collResv.repeatability is None or
                          collResv.somethingElse):
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()

PEP-8 advise is right here.

http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/#indentation

Below code is advised

# Aligned with opening delimiter
foo = long_function_name(var_one, var_two,
                         var_three, var_four)

# More indentation included to distinguish this from the rest.
def long_function_name(
        var_one, var_two, var_three,
        var_four):
    print(var_one)

Below code is not advised

# Arguments on first line forbidden when not using vertical alignment
foo = long_function_name(var_one, var_two,
    var_three, var_four)

# Further indentation required as indentation is not distinguishable
def long_function_name(
    var_one, var_two, var_three,
    var_four):
    print(var_one)
share|improve this answer

PEP-8 actually seems contradictory here. While the example under "Maximum Line Length" shows the use of parentheses and a standard 4-character indent, the "Indentation" section says, with respect to function declarations, "further indentation should be used to clearly distinguish itself as a continuation line.". I don't see why this would be restricted only to "def" and not to "if".

share|improve this answer

An option I sometimes use (although I'm not completely sold on its readability):

if (collResv.repeatability is None or
    collResv.somethingElse
):
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()

Possibly it would be more readable this way:

if (
collResv.repeatability is None or
collResv.somethingElse
):
    collResv.rejected = True
    collResv.rejectCompletely()
share|improve this answer
4  
This is very unlike any Python style idiom--please don't do this. –  Glenn Maynard Feb 25 '11 at 13:06
    
Yeah I should note that I only use Python in simple personal projects that no-one else will ever have to read. –  Blorgbeard Feb 25 '11 at 13:08
    
IMO it looks horrible no matter of the language. That's like putting only ){ on a separate line in C. –  ThiefMaster Feb 25 '11 at 14:04
    
Haha, I do that too (in c#). I don't like it either, but I really hate all the other options :| –  Blorgbeard Feb 25 '11 at 14:33

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.