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We got a table that stores newsletter subscriptions (ID, EmailAddress, MyNewsletter1 etc), and when we save a subscription we first check to see if there already is a subscription set up for that email address. If there is, we update that record, if there isn't we insert a new one. Somehow a duplicate email address has sneaked its way in there, and I'm not sure how. The primary key is ID, so we can change that to be EmailAddress instead, but I'm still curious how this happened. Could it be a concurrency issue? This is the code:

public static void SaveSubscription(NewsletterSubscription subscription)
{
    using (MyDataContext db = new MyDataContext())
    {
        // does this email already have subscriptions?
        NewsletterSubscription result = db.NewsletterSubscriptions.SingleOrDefault(r => r.Email == subscription.Email);

        if (result != null)
        {
            // update instead of creating new record
            result.MyNewsletter1 = subscription.MyNewsletter1;
            result.MyNewsletter2 = subscription.MyNewsletter2;
            result.MyNewsletter3 = subscription.MyNewsletter3;
            result.MyNewsletter4 = subscription.MyNewsletter4;
        }
        else
        {
            // create new subscription record
            subscription.RegisterDate = DateTime.Now;
            db.NewsletterSubscriptions.InsertOnSubmit(subscription);
        }

        db.SubmitChanges();
    }
}

Thanks,

Annelie

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sounds like this is simply a race condition between two connections doing the read/insert. One fix might be to create a serializable transaction around the two operations:

using (var tran = new TransactionScope()) { 
    using (MyDataContext db = new MyDataContext()) {
        // ... your existing code here
    }
    tran.Complete();
}

This forces a key-range lock during the select, so any second thread doing the read will be blocked until the transaction has completed; so you won't get two SPIDs seeing "no row" then trying to do the insert; instead the first SPID will block the second for a few critical milliseconds while it does the work; only when the first SPID has decided whether (or not) to insert the data (and call Complete or rollback) does the second SPID get to know.

Also, note that you don't need to change the primary key to make it unique - just add a unique constraint. Then you don't have to change anything referencing that table.

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will make these changes, thanks for you help! –  annelie Feb 25 '11 at 14:15
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As some have already stated this is probably a concurrency issue and you should let the database help you avoid it. If you don't want to change the primary key then you could add a unique constraint to your email column.

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The code seems ok, so I would guess a concurrency issue. If the e-mail should only have one record anyway, I would suggest adding/replacing that on the primary key.

In that case SubmitChanges will throw an exception if you try to insert the same record again. Then you can take measured inside the catch block to update the record (or discard it if that is proper), and continue execution.

Get the database to help you avoid duplicated by providing proper primary keys.

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