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I'm using LESS to improve my css and am trying to nest a class within a class. There's a fairly complicated hierarchy but for some reason my nesting doesn't work. I have this:

.g {
    float: left;
    color: #323a13;
    .border(1px,#afc945);
    .gradient(#afc945, #c8da64);
    .common;
    span {
        .my-span;
        .border-dashed(1px,rgba(255,255,255,0.3));
    }
    .posted {
         .my-posted;
         span {
            border: none;
         }
    }
}

I can't get the .g.posted to work. it just shows the .g bit. If i do this it's fine:

.g {
    float: left;
    color: #323a13;
    .border(1px,#afc945);
    .gradient(#afc945, #c8da64);
    .common;
    span {
        .my-span;
        .border-dashed(1px,rgba(255,255,255,0.3));
    }
}

.g.posted {
         .my-posted;
         span {
            border: none;
         }
    }

I'd like to nest the .posted in .g though. Any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 59 down vote accepted

LESS doesn't work this way.

.class1.class2 {} - defines two classes on the same DOM node, but

.class1 {
    .class2 {}
}

defines nested nodes. .class2 will only be applied if it is a child of a node with the class class1.

I've been confused with this too and my conclusion is that LESS needs a this keyword :).

[EDIT]

As I have been downvoted without any comment or justification, I feel obliged to react to what I feel like might be the cause of the downvote.

The & character has the function of a this keyword, actually (a thing I did not know at the moment of writing the answer). It is possible to write:

.class1 {
    &.class2 {}
}

and the generated CSS will look like this:

.class.class2 {}

For the record, @grobitto was the first to post this piece of information.

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3  
sass has that functionality built in with the & operator. –  sevenseacat Feb 25 '11 at 12:27
    
awww, no. I thought LESS was awesome until now...thanks –  newbie_86 Feb 25 '11 at 13:06
1  
LESS is still awesome, especially the PHP LESS preprocessor, with its modified, more flexible syntax. But until there's some sort of commonly accepted syntax, such problems will arise from time to time. In my view, this one is LESS' only drawback. –  mingos Feb 25 '11 at 13:35
1  
@newbie_86 You cannot mix sass and native css syntax. So migrating to Sass requires a complete re-write of your styles, while in less you can already compile your existing styles and start re-writing them piece by piece. –  topless May 8 '13 at 12:34
1  
I was curious why second answer have more ups than this one, despite it's same and have latter date. Then i saw last sentence and upped both answers –  llamerr Jan 7 at 16:40
.g {
    &.posted {
    }
}

you should add "&" before .posted

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