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I've heard it is used as overloaded operator+ for example

class MyClass
{
    int x;
public:
    MyClass(int num):x(num){}
    MyClass operator+(const MyClass &rhs)
    {
        return rhs.x + x;
    }
};

int main()
{
    MyClass x(100);
    MyClass y(100);
    MyClass z = x + y;
}

Is this really the use of unary plus operator or is it really a binary + operator?

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up vote 14 down vote accepted

This is not overloading and using unary + .. You need to either make that a free function or make the member function take 0 arguments

class MyClass
{
    int x;
public:
    MyClass(int num):x(num){}
    MyClass operator+() const
    {
        return *this;
    }
};

int main() {
  MyClass x = 42;
  + x;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you return a 'reference' instead a value? – user963241 Mar 9 '11 at 16:45
4  
@cpx yes but that would probably be a bad idea, because all types like int yield a value too, instead of a reference to the original variable. "Do it like the ints do" (Scott Meyers). – Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 9 '11 at 16:51

That's a binary + operator. To overload the unary plus operator, you'd need something like this.

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When an operator-function is a member function, it has one more argument (this) than explicitly mentioned in the declaration. So in your case it's the binary +, the first argument is this, the second is the passed argument.

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This has been asked a few times before.

Your operator+ is binary. If defined as a member function needs to be const.

class MyClass
{
    int x;
public:
    MyClass(int num):x(num){}
    MyClass operator+(const MyClass &rhs) const
    {
        return rhs.x + x;
    }
};

It is quite often implemented in terms of operator +=

Note you have switched the commutativity but it will work as + for int is commutative.

A unary+ operator as a member would take no parameters and would not modify the object thus should be const. The implementation is up to your object. You could use it as "abs" for your int. (Using it as a no-op serves little purpose).

    MyClass MyClass::operator+() const
    {
        return ( x >= 0 ) ? MyClass( x ) : MyClass(-x);
    }
share|improve this answer
4  
Using it as abs, on the other hand, would be just confusing. – UncleBens Feb 25 '11 at 13:17
1  
Yeah but I see no point in overloading an operator to be a no-op albeit that it forces a copy. – CashCow Feb 27 '11 at 16:50
    
Then don't overload operator+. If you want absolute value, use a function that means absolute value. – David Stone Sep 1 '13 at 16:46

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