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I have a Java application that runs on desktop computers. It encrypts and decrypts its documents using AES. When I encrypt a file using the desktop version, and decrypt it in the Android emulator, the decryption fails. The cipher.doFinal line throws this exception: javax.crypto.BadPaddingException: pad block corrupted.

When the desktop version runs, it uses the Sun crypto provider. When the Android version runs, it uses the BouncyCastle provider. I realize that the call to Cipher.getInstance is only specifying the algorithm ("AES"). I have tried to specify the algorithm, mode, and padding scheme. For instance, Cipher.GetInstance("AES/ECB/PKCS5Padding"), but, I have yet to determine a mode and padding scheme that is compatible between the Sun crypto provider and BouncyCastle.

I realize that I could simply bundle BouncyCastle with my application, and use it on the desktop and in Android, but I'd prefer not to. I'd also like to avoid any solution to this problem that forces users of the desktop program to convert their encrypted files into a format that works in Android.

My question is: how can I successfully decrypt, on Android, files that were encrypted using the Sun crypto provider?

Sincerely,

Eric Bergman-Terrell www.EricBT.com

private static byte[] getPasswordMessageDigest(String password) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException {
    MessageDigest messageDigest = MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-512");
    byte[] passwordMessageDigest = messageDigest.digest(password.getBytes());

    return passwordMessageDigest;
}

public static SecretKey createSecretKey(String password) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, InvalidKeySpecException {
    byte[] passwordMessageDigest = getPasswordMessageDigest(password);

    SecureRandom secureRandom = SecureRandom.getInstance("SHA1PRNG");
    secureRandom.setSeed(passwordMessageDigest);

    KeyGenerator keyGenerator = KeyGenerator.getInstance("AES");
    keyGenerator.init(128, secureRandom);

    SecretKey secretKey = keyGenerator.generateKey();

    return secretKey;
}

public static byte[] encrypt(String password, byte[] plainText) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeySpecException, InvalidKeyException, IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException {
    Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");

    SecretKey secretKey = createSecretKey(password);

    cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, secretKey);

    byte[] cipherText = cipher.doFinal(plainText);

    return cipherText;
}

public static byte[] decrypt(String password, byte[] cipherText) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeySpecException, InvalidKeyException, IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException {
    Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");

    SecretKey secretKey = createSecretKey(password);

    cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, secretKey);

    byte[] plainText = cipher.doFinal(cipherText);

    return plainText;
}
share|improve this question
    
Probably irrelevant, but don't use the parameterless String.getBytes() method - it uses the platform default encoding, which is really not a good idea for portability. –  Jon Skeet Feb 25 '11 at 14:29
    
Jon, I've verified that the String.getBytes() call returns the same byte values on the desktop, and in Android, so that issue is not causing this problem. However I will specify an encoding to avoid the portability pitfall you identified. Thanks! –  Eric Bergman-Terrell Feb 25 '11 at 15:33
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