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With the following html

<ul id="accordion">
    <li>
        <ul>
            <li><h3>title</h3></li>
        </ul>
    </li>
    <li>
        <ul>
            <li><h3>title</h3></li>
        </ul>
    </li>
    <li>
        <ul>
            <li><h3>title</h3></li>
        </ul>
    </li>       
</ul>

I have the outer ul stored in a variable

var acc = $("#accordion")[0]  

in the general case I am just passed the DOM element and can't necessarily specify a selector

When a h3 is clicked I want to get the top level li that contains it. In the general case there could be any kind of markup between the accordion ul and the element I wnat to fetch, and between the element to fetch and the h3... but what I will have is a selector that lets me get to the element from the accordion using the ">" selector.

e.g. var items = $(">li", acc);

The trouble is that when I start from a clicked h3 ("this" inside the click handler) It's difficult to find the specific item.

$(this).closest(">li", acc);

returns an empty jQuery (maybe a bug? although it's difficult to define what ">" means in this instance, where the top level element is dynamic)

$(this).parents(">li")

doesn't allow a context to be set, so could potentially return too many elements

Is there a way to do what I want?

*edit: html now makes the problem clearer

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4 Answers

How about $(h3).closest(".item"); ? According to "closest" documentation, it will traverse the DOM up from current node until it finds a node that matches your selector.

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This should be all that's necessary - the ">" qualifier is just wrong in that case, especially without anything to its left. –  Pointy Feb 25 '11 at 14:53
1  
but if my markup was <div class="item"><p class="item"><h3>title</h3></p></div> this woudl return the p rather than the div (the markup I've used in the exmaple is a bit contrived, but a real world example where using > is useful is with nested ul and li elements) –  wheresrhys Feb 25 '11 at 15:10
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Go the other way, to guarantee the child relationship:

acc.children('li').has(this);
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Nice solution, though it's a shame it traverses the dom outside of acc in order to find an element within acc –  wheresrhys Feb 25 '11 at 15:26
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@wheresrhys, thanks for the prompt - I just thought of another way, see update. –  Box9 Feb 25 '11 at 15:29
    
even better! I think a problem in general though is that the selector could contain ">", but not necessarily (I'm writing a fairly general accordion plugin), so would need to also use a regex on the selector to check whether to use your method or closest(), and then if using your method, would need to further analyse the selector(e.g. ">li .target") to split off the part of it that actually is the descendant from the remainder of the selector... all work which should really be inside jQuery I reckon bugs.jquery.com/ticket/8383#comment:1 –  wheresrhys Feb 25 '11 at 15:41
    
unless, would find(">li") do the same as childern("li")? –  wheresrhys Feb 25 '11 at 15:43
1  
@wheresrhys that's a good point about use with delegate. At the moment you may just have to resort to a filter function as it's the most flexible. –  Box9 Feb 26 '11 at 2:21
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up vote 0 down vote accepted
$(">li",acc).has(this)

works in general; setting a context on an initial jQuery appears to be the only place that startinga selector with ">" works in jQuery

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Also, $(acc).find(">li").has(this) works –  wheresrhys Feb 28 '11 at 9:36
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jQuery(this).parents('li:last');
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but this won't work when >li contains li elements as children –  wheresrhys Feb 25 '11 at 17:00
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