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In a controller, I do the following:

DBContext DB = new DBContext();
var u = DB.Users.Find(1);
u.firstname = "blah";

I want to do the same from within a model...

namespace Project.Models
  public class User
    public void resetPassword()
      // Generate new password, etc.
      this.password = "blah";

Any idea how I go about doing this? It seems UpdateModel() is only available from within controllers.

I'm using EntityFramework Code-First CTP5.

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What are you achieving using UpdateModel() here that would be related to the DB? –  Serge Wautier Feb 28 '11 at 8:07

2 Answers 2

I think UpTheCreek is correct but it probably needs some explanation so I'll try to expand on his/her answer. The first step would be to use the repository pattern. You can find many examples of this pattern in MVC with a google search - this is a particularly gentle introduction (about 3/4's down the page).

The walkthrough goes on to mention dependency injection, and that's something that's also worth looking in to. I tend to favor Ninject myself, however there are other dependency injection containers available.

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Yes, this is a better answer than mine :) –  UpTheCreek Apr 9 '11 at 12:51

Putting data access concerns in your model is not a good idea.

Update: Yes, you'd usually have a data access layer for this. As Andy says, the currently fashionable way to do this is using a repository. As a rule, you don't want anything in your model that is not core business logic.

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How about from a non-controller class, where I get the same issue? It's obviously wrong to call a function in one controller from another controller, so logically I'd encapsulate this into a library class..? –  James I Feb 25 '11 at 15:13
Why the -1?..... –  UpTheCreek Feb 26 '11 at 12:34

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