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I'm trying to use apache's CustomLog directive to pass log lines into a python script (which should log into a django backend). I'm using the following customlog line in a virtual host:

CustomLog "|/usr/bin/python -u /home/rolf/feedmemore/myproject/logger.py > /tmp/out.txt 2> /tmp/err.txt" combined

This is the main loop in logger.py:

c = sys.stdin.read(1)
line = ""
while True:

    if c:
        line += c
        if ord(c) == 4:
            break
    else:
        sys.stderr.write("huh?\n")

    if c == '\n':
        print line
        logline(line.rstrip('\n'))
        line = ""

    c = sys.stdin.read(1)

At first my belief was that if I received "" from apache with read(1) then the program should exit. However, apache keeps throwing "" regardless of any server activity. /tmp/err.txt quickly fills up with "huh?"'s. What's up with that?

How is my logging program supposed to know when input is finished and should exit? I've tried checking for 0x4 (EOT) but that doesn't work.

My first attempt was with using "readline()" but that failed equally.

Any other suggestions on how to centrally log requests in django would also be helpful.

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Forgot to mention: I'm using Python 2.6.6 and Apache/2.2.16 (Debian) – Rolf Feb 25 '11 at 16:04

Just focusing on your last line of the message. You probably don't want to be running a python script for every request. You're tossing in a ~20MB program to read a single line of text.

Read up on modern syslogs, such as syslog-ng. You're paying too much of a price for something very simple.

http://www.balabit.com/sites/default/files/documents/syslog-ng-admin-guide_en.html/configuring_destinations_tcpudp.html

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My understanding is that the process is opened by apache when apache starts up and an eof is written when apache is stopped. So python is just started once and apache writes all loglines into it's stdin. Python isn't executed for every line. – Rolf Feb 25 '11 at 16:58
    
@Rolf: ah ok, that makes me feel better. In that case I would expect you'd be able to do this. What was the problem when you loop did for readline()? – Trey Stout Feb 25 '11 at 17:42
    
readline() returned empty string every time. This behaviour seems correct considering apache keeps writing EOF's when there's no loglines to be written. – Rolf Feb 25 '11 at 18:33

I've got it to work. Apache closes the stdin when it stops so you can just wait until sys.stdin.closed is True in the main loop and ignore empty strings.

Strangely apache spawns an extra zombie logger process now. Since the ppid of the zombie is 1 the code just exits if it finds itself with a ppid of 1.

This works for me:

if os.getppid() == 1:
    sys.exit()
c = sys.stdin.read(1)
line = ""
while not sys.stdin.closed:
    if c:
        line += c

    if c == '\n':
        print line,
        logline(line.rstrip('\n'))
        line = ""

    c = sys.stdin.read(1)
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