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How does SystemExit behave differently from other Exceptions? I think I understand some of the reasoning about why it wouldn't be good to raise a proper Exception. For example, you wouldn't want something strange like this to happen:

begin
  exit
rescue => e
  # Silently swallow up the exception and don't exit
end

But how does the rescue ignore SystemExit? (What criteria does it use?)

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1  
This has to be a duplicate. –  Andrew Grimm Feb 27 '11 at 22:36
    
@AndrewGrimm It certainly is a FAQ from mailing list and IRC, but I can't seem to find this question exactly on S/O. The closest I found was "Which exceptions do you catch when you don't specify an exception class in Ruby", but it's sort of a duplicate answer, not a duplicate question. –  Phrogz Feb 28 '11 at 15:52
    
@Andrew I thought someone else had to have asked the same thing too, but I didn't find anything that specifically answered how SystemExit is handled. @Phrogz Thanks for the link to the related Q. –  Benjamin Oakes Mar 1 '11 at 15:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

When you write rescue without one or more classes, it is the same as writing:

begin
  ...
rescue StandardError => e
  ...
end

There are Exceptions that do not inherit from StandardError, however. SystemExit is one of these, and so it is not captured. Here is a subset of the hierarchy in Ruby 1.9.2, which you can find out yourself:

BasicObject
  Exception
    NoMemoryError
    ScriptError
      LoadError
        Gem::LoadError
      NotImplementedError
      SyntaxError
    SecurityError
    SignalException
      Interrupt
    StandardError
      ArgumentError
      EncodingError
        Encoding::CompatibilityError
        Encoding::ConverterNotFoundError
        Encoding::InvalidByteSequenceError
        Encoding::UndefinedConversionError
      FiberError
      IOError
        EOFError
      IndexError
        KeyError
        StopIteration
      LocalJumpError
      NameError
        NoMethodError
      RangeError
        FloatDomainError
      RegexpError
      RuntimeError
      SystemCallError
      ThreadError
      TypeError
      ZeroDivisionError
    SystemExit
    SystemStackError
    fatal

You can thus capture just SystemExit with:

begin
  ...
rescue SystemExit => e
  ...
end

...or you can choose to capture every exception, including SystemExit with:

begin
  ...
rescue Exception => e
  ...
end

Try it yourself:

begin
  exit 42
  puts "No no no!"
rescue Exception => e
  puts "Nice try, buddy."
end
puts "And on we run..."

#=> "Nice try, buddy."
#=> "And on we run..."

Note that this example will not work in (some versions of?) IRB, which supplies its own exit method that masks the normal Object#exit.

In 1.8.7:

method :exit
#=> #<Method: Object(IRB::ExtendCommandBundle)#exit>

In 1.9.3:

method :exit
#=> #<Method: main.irb_exit>
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1  
Thanks for the info. I knew you could capture SystemExit by itself, but I didn't know that not specifying an exception class causes only StandardError exceptions to be rescued. Seems to explain it -- thanks! –  Benjamin Oakes Feb 25 '11 at 20:06
    
This is awesome for testing whether or not something exits –  Keith Smiley Apr 29 '13 at 17:40

This exception is raised by the sys.exit() function. When it is not handled, the Python interpreter exits; no stack traceback is printed.
If the associated value is a plain integer, it specifies the system exit status (passed to C’s exit() function); If it is None, the exit status is zero;
if it has another type (such as a string), the object’s value is printed and the exit status is one.

Source : Built-in Exceptions


EDIT (after 1st comment) :

Look at this. This will definitely be helpful.

PS : I am not sure though. Please let me know, if its incorrect.

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1  
Thanks for the reply. However, I'm asking about Ruby's SystemExit rather than Python's. (Related implementation, I'm sure, though.) –  Benjamin Oakes Feb 25 '11 at 15:24

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