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This is the code in which I'mm converting string time to date time formate and the to seconds, but it is displaying some strange value. Kindly help me

Code:

struct tm tm;
time_t t;
char s[25]="Sat Feb 19 12:53:39 2011";
if (strptime(s, "%A %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y", &tm) != NULL)


printf("year: %d; month: %d; day: %d;\n", tm.tm_year, tm.tm_mon, tm.tm_mday);
printf("hour: %d; minute: %d; second: %d\n",  tm.tm_hour, tm.tm_min, tm.tm_sec);
printf("week day: %d; year day: %d\n", tm.tm_wday, tm.tm_yday);

tm.tm_isdst = -1;      
t = mktime(&tm);
printf("seconds since the Epoch: %ld\n", (long) t);

out put is

year: 111; month: 1; day: 19;

hour: 12; minute: 53; second: 40

week day: 6; year day: 49

seconds since the Epoch: 1298102020

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What strange values? The only weird thing I see are how the lines are broken up. – DopplerShift Feb 25 '11 at 15:40
up vote 2 down vote accepted

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time.h:

Calendar time (also known as "broken-down time") in the C standard library is represented as the struct tm structure, consisting of the following members:

Member  Description
int tm_hour hour (0 – 23)
int tm_isdst    Daylight saving time enabled (> 0), disabled (= 0), or unknown (< 0)
int tm_mday day of the month (1 – 31)
int tm_min  minutes (0 – 59)
int tm_mon  month (0 – 11, 0 = January)
int tm_sec  seconds (0 – 60, 60 = Leap second)
int tm_wday day of the week (0 – 6, 0 = Sunday)
int tm_yday day of the year (0 – 365)
int tm_year year since 1900

ie you need to add 1900 to the year, and the months are zero-based.

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@Michael The 0-61 range for tm_sec has been shortened to 0-60 now. (manpages.unixforum.co.uk/man-pages/linux/opensuse-10.2/0p/…) – Simon Ould Feb 25 '11 at 16:04

You have to add 1900 to tm.tm_year.

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tm.tm_year is the year number since 1900. And month 0 is January. Just adjust for this as needed.

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The output is correct. struct tm stores time as the following:

Member         Meaning            Range 
tm_sec   seconds after the minute  0-61* 
tm_min   minutes after the hour    0-59 
tm_hour  hours since midnight      0-23 
tm_mday  day of the month          1-31 
tm_mon   months since January      0-11 
tm_year  years since 1900  
tm_wday  days since Sunday         0-6 
tm_yday  days since January 1      0-365 
tm_isdst Daylight Saving Time flag 

Source

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struct tm tm;
time_t t;
char s[25]="Sat Feb 19 12:53:39 2011";
if (strptime(s, "%A %b %d %H:%M:%S %Y", &tm) != NULL)

/* Don't do: tm.tm_year += 1900; 
   before computing the Epoch or you'll break it! 
*/

printf("year: %d; month: %d; day: %d;\n", tm.tm_year + 1900, tm.tm_mon, tm.tm_mday);
printf("hour: %d; minute: %d; second: %d\n",  tm.tm_hour, tm.tm_min, tm.tm_sec);
printf("week day: %d; year day: %d\n", tm.tm_wday, tm.tm_yday);

tm.tm_isdst = -1;      
t = mktime(&tm);
printf("seconds since the Epoch: %ld\n", (long) t); 
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