Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following while statement:

while ((leftSide.Count-rightSide.Count!=-1)&&(leftSide.Count-rightSide.Count!= 0))
{
     // Do stuff here
}

I would love to write this something like this:

while (leftSide.Count - rightSide.Count ! in [-1, 0])
{
     // Do stuff here
}

but that is illegal syntax. I am wondering, is there some way to that? Some syntax I don't know?

I want to see if the difference of the counts in a set of numbers without having to re-include the whole left side of the statement again?

I suppose I could do this:

int x = leftSide.Count-rightSide.Count;
while ((x != -1) && (x != 0))
{
     // Do stuff here
     x = leftSide.Count-rightSide.Count;
}

but I would rather not.

If there is no way to do a "set" comparison does anyone know why? C# is such a full featured language that it seems odd to have something like this missing.

share|improve this question
    
See: stackoverflow.com/questions/973916/… –  Mike Atlas Feb 25 '11 at 16:37

8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Using extension methods, you could easily create an In operator:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static Boolean In<T>(this T obj, params T[] items)
    {
        return items.Contains(obj);
    }
}

Usage:

Int32 i = 10;
i.In(10, 20, 30); // True
share|improve this answer
    
Very very nice! Using the params makes it really usable. –  Vaccano Feb 25 '11 at 17:30
    
Added that to my extension methods class and now my while looks like this: –  Vaccano Feb 25 '11 at 17:31
    
while (!(leftSide.Count - rightSide.Count).In(-1, 0)) –  Vaccano Feb 25 '11 at 17:32
    
I also like this because it can be done in one line. –  Vaccano Feb 25 '11 at 17:41
    
I wrote about this in my blog. thecodepage.com/… –  Gabriel McAdams Nov 21 '11 at 2:46

It doesn't need to be in the language, because it can easily be in a library:

private static readonly int[] ValidValues = { -1, 0 };

...

if (!ValidValues.Contains(leftSide.Count - rightSide.Count))
{
    ...
}

I've used an array here because it's so small... but you would want to consider using a HashSet<int> for a large collection.

share|improve this answer
    
Once again, you are the king of the quick-draw. Well played Mr. Skeet, well played. –  Justin Niessner Feb 25 '11 at 16:36
    
OK, I can use that. I come from a Delphi background where this was part of the language. I guess I just assumed it should be a language level feature in C# too. –  Vaccano Feb 25 '11 at 16:43
new[]{0,1}.Contains(leftSide.Count - rightSide.Count)
share|improve this answer
    
This is probably the best C# way to do it. I went with the extension method because it reads a bit better to me. (With my delphi background) –  Vaccano Feb 25 '11 at 17:42

You can use HashSet (or anything implementing ISet) to do set comparisons. For your purposes, this is overkill.

I suspect that using x>0 would work for your example though.

share|improve this answer

For larger amounts, you can declare a List<T> and use the Contains method:

List<int> values = new List<int> {-1, 0};

if(!values.Contains(x))
  //do stuff
share|improve this answer

Use extension methods:

public static class DoubleInExtension
{
    public static bool IsIn(this double x, double a, double b)
    {
        return x >= a && x <= b;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
int[] set = {-1, 0};
while (!set.Contains(leftSide.Count - rightSide.Count))
{
//Do stuff here
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.