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Clearly I am missing something important about stringstreams in general here, but could someone explain why

#include <sstream>
using namespace std;

stringstream foo() {
  stringstream ss;
  return ss;
}

Fails with

In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.4/ios:39,
             from /usr/include/c++/4.4/ostream:40,
             from /usr/include/c++/4.4/iostream:40,
             from rwalk.cpp:1:/usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/ios_base.h: In copy constructor ‘std::basic_ios<char,    std::char_traits<char> >::basic_ios(const std::basic_ios<char, std::char_traits<char> >&)’:/usr/include/c++/4.4/bits/ios_base.h:790: error: ‘std::ios_base::ios_base(const std::ios_base&)’ is private
/usr/include/c++/4.4/iosfwd:47: error: within this context
/usr/include/c++/4.4/iosfwd: In copy constructor ‘std::basic_stringstream<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_stringstream(const std::basic_stringstream<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >&)’:
/usr/include/c++/4.4/iosfwd:75: note: synthesized method ‘std::basic_ios<char, std::char_traits<char> >::basic_ios(const std::basic_ios<char, std::char_traits<char> >&)’ first required here 
/usr/include/c++/4.4/streambuf: In copy constructor ‘std::basic_stringbuf<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_stringbuf(const std::basic_stringbuf<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >&)’:
/usr/include/c++/4.4/streambuf:770: error: ‘std::basic_streambuf<_CharT, _Traits>::basic_streambuf(const std::basic_streambuf<_CharT, _Traits>&) [with _CharT = char, _Traits = std::char_traits<char>]’ is private
/usr/include/c++/4.4/iosfwd:63: error: within this context
/usr/include/c++/4.4/iosfwd: In copy constructor ‘std::basic_stringstream<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_stringstream(const std::basic_stringstream<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >&)’:
/usr/include/c++/4.4/iosfwd:75: note: synthesized method ‘std::basic_stringbuf<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_stringbuf(const std::basic_stringbuf<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >&)’ first required here 
rwalk.cpp: In function ‘std::stringstream foo()’:
rwalk.cpp:12: note: synthesized method ‘std::basic_stringstream<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >::basic_stringstream(const std::basic_stringstream<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> >&)’ first required here 

How does one return a stringstream from a function properly? (edit: added the headers for a complete code snippet and fixed typo)

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5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

After correct the type-o in the return type (noted by Mahesh), your code will not compile in C++03 because stringstream is not copyable. However if your compiler supports C++0x, turning that on allows your code to compile because stringstream is MoveConstructible.

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I think it cannot compile even in C++11 without std::move(). –  Petr Pervukhin Oct 19 at 15:31
    
@PetrPervukhin: Why? According to 27.8.6 [stringstream.cons], basic_stringstream has a valid, accessible move constructor which will be used to move ss out of foo. Is there some other reason you see that makes the code not valid C++11? –  Howard Hinnant Oct 19 at 16:32
    
I can say about C++03, that if there is no copy constructor in class A, you cannot write A a = A(), even if compiler can apply copy constructor elision. So I'm not sure that compiler can replace copy construction with move construction in this example. –  Petr Pervukhin Oct 19 at 20:15
    
Excuse me. I tried it in Coliru, it works fine. So my next question for google and SO will be "why?". =) –  Petr Pervukhin Oct 19 at 20:29
1  
@PetrPervukhin: See open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/papers/2002/… for rationale. –  Howard Hinnant Oct 19 at 21:44

You can't return a stream from a function by value, because that implies you'd have to copy the stream. C++ streams are not copyable.

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Thanks, I didn't knew that. –  Mahesh Feb 25 '11 at 16:51
    
I may be asking the wrong question - but why can't I copy the stream? –  Hooked Feb 25 '11 at 16:52
5  
@Hooked it's not obvious what the semantics of stream copies would be. When you write into one copy, should the write also occur in the other? When you close one stream, should the other close as well? When you change one stream's locale, should the other change as well? In correct programs you shouldn't have the need to copy a stream. –  wilhelmtell Feb 25 '11 at 16:58

While it does not work in C++03, it should work in C++11. However, current compilers may still have problems (due to the lack of full C++11 compatibility), e.g. the above code will not compile in g++ 4.6.1

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In C++03 you'll have to either pass the stringstream as a parameter by non-const reference or return just the resulting string (ss.str()), as you can't copy the stream.

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You have to include sstream and have std::stringstream instead of stringstream.

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  David Ansermot Oct 19 at 14:44

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