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I understood synchronization of a block of code means that particular code will be accessed by only one thread at time even many thread are waiting to access that.

when we are writing thread class in run method we starting synchronized block by giving object. for example

 class MyThread extends Thread{
   String sa;
   public MyThread(String s){
       sa=s;
   } 
   public void run(){
     synchronized(sa){
         if(sa.equals("notdone"){
             //do some thing on object
         }
     }
   }    
 }

here we gave sa object to synchronized block what is the need of that.any how we are going to provide synchronization for that particular block of code

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2  
Could you please clarify your question? –  reef Feb 25 '11 at 16:54
    
The point of the synchronized block is thread-safe access to volatile fields in a multi-threaded environment. This tutorial may be helpful: csc.villanova.edu/~mdamian/threads/javamonitors.html –  Joseph Weissman Feb 25 '11 at 16:57
    
@reef sir why some answers that were there before are removed now... –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 17:21

4 Answers 4

I would suggest

  • extend Runnable rather than Thread.
  • don't lock in the Runnable on an external. Instead you should be calling a method which may use an internal lock.
  • String is not a good choice as a lock. It means that "hi" and "hi" will share a lock but new String("hi") will not.
  • if you are locking all other threads for the life of the thread, why are you using multiple threads?
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..ok i got what your are saying may be my code is not proper with a lock on string object.i am asking that in normal synchronized method we are not giving any object.but in synchronized block we are giving an object what is the need of that? –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 17:10
    
In a complex object you can have a number of locks and you need a synchronized block for each one. Sometimes you don't want to lock on this because it can be locked outside your class as well, so you might lock on an Object you have provided. Some thread safe collections don't have thread safe iterators, so you have to lock the collection, just for iteration (but nothing else) –  Peter Lawrey Feb 25 '11 at 22:25

The parameter object of the synchronized block is the object on which the block locks. Thus all synchronized blocks with the same object are excluding each other's (and all synchronized methods' of this same object) simultaneous execution.

So if you have this example

class ExampleA extends Thread() {

    public ExampleA(Object l) {
       this.x = l;
    }

    private Object x;

    public void run() {
        synchronized(x) {     // <-- synchronized-block A
            // do something
        }
    }
}
class ExampleB extends Thread() {

    public ExampleB(Object l) {
       this.x = l;
    }

    private Object x;

    public void run() {
        synchronized(x) {     // <-- synchronized-block B
            // do something else
        }
    }
}

Object o1 = new Object();
Object o2 = new Object();

Thread eA1 = new ExampleA(o1);
Thread eA2 = new ExampleA(o2);
Thread eB1 = new ExampleB(o1);
Thread eB2 = new ExampleB(o2);

eA1.start(); eA2.start(); eB1.start(); eB2.start();

Now we have two synchronized blocks (A and B, in classes ExampleA and ExampleB), and we have two lock objects (o1 and o2).

If we now look at the simultaneous execution, we can see that:

  • A1 can be executed in parallel to A2 and B2, but not to B1.
  • A2 can be executed in parallel to A1 and B1, but not to B2.
  • B1 can be executed in parallel to A2 and B2, but not to A1.
  • B2 can be executed in parallel to A1 and B1, but not to A2.

Thus, the synchronization depends only on the parameter object, not on the choice of synchronization block.


In your example, you are using this:

 synchronized(sa){
     if(sa.equals("notdone"){
         //do some thing on object
     }
 }

This looks like you try to avoid that someone changes your instance variable sa to another string while you are comparing it and working - but it does not avoid this.

Synchronization does not work on a variable, it works on an object - and the object in question should usually be either some object which contains the variable (the current MyThread object in your case, reachable by this), or a special object used just for synchronization, and which is not changed.

As Peter Lawrey said, String objects usually are bad choices for synchronization locks, since all equal String literals are the same object (i.e. would exclude each other's synchronized blocks), while a equal non-literal string (e.g. created at runtime) is not the same object, and thus would not exclude synchronized blocks by other such objects or literals, which often leads to subtle bugs.

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All threads synchronized on this objects will wait until current thread finishes its work. This is useful for example if you have read/write operation to collection that your wish to synchronized. So you can write sychronized block in methods set and get. In this case if one thread is reading information not all other threads that want to either read or write will wait.

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sir ..i understood what does synchronized block will do but i didn't get what is the need to give object for that particular synchronized block –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 16:58

So the question is what is the function of the object that a block synchronizes on?

All instances of Object have what is called a monitor. In normal execution this monitor is unowned.

A thread wishing to enter a synchronized block must take possession of the object monitor. Only one thread can posses the monitor at a time, however. So, if the monitor is currently unowned, the thread takes possession and executes the synchronized block of code. The thread releases the monitor when it leaves the synchronized block.

If the monitor is currently owned, then the thread needing to enter the synchronized block must wait for the monitor to be freed so it can take ownership and enter the block. More than one thread can be waiting and if so, then only one will be given ownership of the monitor. The rest will go back to waiting.

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