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I have the following code in which dbh constructor may throw exception. The question I have is, dbh is declared inside try block. Will it be available after the catch? If yes, are there any other exceptions where the scope resolution is different than {} ? If not, what is the best design alternative?

status func(const char* field, char** value)
{
    try {
        dbhandler<recType> dbh(("dbName"),("table"));
    }
    catch (std::runtime_error &e) {
        LOG_ERR << e.what() << endl ;
        return false;
    }
    catch (...) {
        LOG_ERR << "Unknown exception" << endl ;
        return false;
    }

    rc = dbh.start("key",field, val);
    return rc;
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Will it be available after the catch?

No. It will be destroyed at the end of the block in which it is declared, just like any other local variable.

try {
    dbhandler<recType> dbh(("dbName"),("table")); 
}   // dbh.~dbhandler<recType>() is called to destroy dbh

What is the best design alternative?

Declare dbh outside of the try block or move all the code that uses it into the try block. Which one makes the most sense depends on your specific use case.

On a somewhat related note, if you catch (...), you should either rethrow the exception or terminate the application: you have no idea what exception is being handled and in general you have no idea whether it is safe to continue executing.

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I would recommend that you use the first option here, unless the amount of code that used dbh is very small. You may have to use more try blocks but catching exceptions early and catching them specifically is crucial to safe coding. :) –  Dennis Feb 25 '11 at 17:39
    
@Dennis: Perhaps. If you have a whole sequence of tasks that needs to complete successfully, it may be easier to handle failures at a higher level. This is a major advantage of using exceptions for error handling: you can handle errors wherever it makes the most sense to do so. –  James McNellis Feb 25 '11 at 17:45
1  
+1 for the catch(...) part. Eating exceptions is just terrible! –  Bo Persson Feb 25 '11 at 17:48
    
Got the answer. Thanks.. I was trying to see the best alternative between a simplified API and error checking –  Kiran Feb 25 '11 at 18:00
1  
"in general you have no idea whether it is safe to continue executing" - two possibilities - either dbhandler is exception-safe, or it isn't. If it is, then it's somewhat vague to catch(...), but the dbhandler documentation might be equally vague, and our program might quite happily operate with limited functionality without handling the db. If dbhandler isn't at least basically exception-safe then it's not strictly our fault that it broke our program. I agree we shouldn't have to catch(...), though, if only because dbhandler shouldn't throw non-std::exception exceptions. –  Steve Jessop Feb 25 '11 at 18:17

According to your function code, it makes much sense to write it like that:

status func(const char* field, char** value)
{
    try {
        dbhandler<recType> dbh(("dbName"),("table"));
        status rc = dbh.start("key",field, val);
        return rc;
    }
    catch (std::runtime_error &e) {
        LOG_ERR << e.what() << endl ;
        return false;
    }
    catch (...) {
        LOG_ERR << "Unknown exception" << endl ;
        return false;
    }
}
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This will return before the catch statement is ever hit - it would be pointless to do any error checking here in this implementation. –  RageD Feb 25 '11 at 17:48
    
@RageD: What do you mean? If an exception is thrown from any code in the try block, the catch handlers will be checked. –  James McNellis Feb 25 '11 at 18:09
    
returning a FAIL or whatever is probably warranted. –  Crazy Eddie Feb 25 '11 at 18:54
    
@James: ah yes, I responded in haste - ignore what I said (sorry, I was on my way out at that time). –  RageD Feb 25 '11 at 19:54

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