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I have a class with the following structure:

class Something 
{

 private static $_instance = null;

 final public function __construct()
 {
   //(...)
   try 
   {
     //(...)
   }
   catch(Exception $e) 
   {
     //(...)
   }
 }
 public static function getInstance() 
 {
   if (self::$_instance === null) 
   {
    self::$_instance = new self;
   }

   return self::$_instance;
 }
 private function __clone()
 {
   //empty
 }

} //end of class

Is it correct and precise to say that, on this class, we have applied a Singleton Design Pattern?

Thanks a lot in advance.

share|improve this question
    
some statements are missing for it to be singleton –  kjy112 Feb 25 '11 at 17:46
    
1) You don't do anything to make that $_instance 2) __clone() is not supposed to be static. –  BoltClock Feb 25 '11 at 17:47
    
Ups... I will edit my code. sorry. –  MEM Feb 25 '11 at 17:51
    
@BoltClock and all: I have edited my question. Does the __clone() comment still applies ? Thanks a lot. –  MEM Feb 25 '11 at 17:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No. For Singelton, it's required that constructor is declared private and class has 'getter' method, most common getInstance(), that you've already implemented.

share|improve this answer
    
@usoban - So I just need to change the scope of the constructor to private? Or better, should I have final static private function __construct(); –  MEM Feb 25 '11 at 17:58
1  
@MEM: private function __construct() is enough, you can't override a private member so it's implied to be final. –  BoltClock Feb 25 '11 at 18:07
    
@BoltClock: but I still can extend it right ? Isn't that an issue somehow? (sorry for this dummy questions. :s) –  MEM Feb 25 '11 at 18:11
1  
@MEM and you will still need to make the public static method that creates and/or returns the singleton instance. The reason for making __construct private is so that "$foo = new Something();" will throw an error. The singleton instance should not be made with a new statement, but rather a separate public static method. example here: php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.patterns.php –  dqhendricks Feb 25 '11 at 18:15
2  
@MEM extending singleton classes gets very sticky. The static singleton getter method will pull the instance variable from the class that it was originally declared in. the static instance variable would also maintain its value from where it was originally declared. unless you do some creative writting, or only have one object of this class or it's extensions at a time, I don't believe it is recommended. –  dqhendricks Feb 25 '11 at 18:22

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