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I've got this RewriteRule to work.

RewriteBase /my/path/
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule . /my/path/index.php [L]

So URLs with a trailing slash work. http://localhost/my/path/foo/bar/
The problem is that URLs without the trailing slash will break relative links. Plus it dosen't look good.

This reaches the maximum number of internal redirects.

RewriteRule ^/my/path/(.*[^/])$ $1/ [R]
RewriteRule . /my/path/index.php [L]

And this will do... http://localhost/my/path/index.php/bar/

RewriteRule . /my/path/index.php
RewriteRule ^/my/path/(.*[^/])$ $1/ [R,L]

Any Ideas or solutions?

share|improve this question
    
The ^/my/path pattern shouldn't match in .htaccess. This is in the virtual host configuration file? –  aaz Feb 25 '11 at 18:25
    
@azz The actual path is more like /sandbox/htaccess/ if that changes anything. –  JDavis Feb 25 '11 at 18:31
    
No, it's that in .htaccess the pattern that RewriteRule matches is the path stripped of the RewriteBase prefix (/my/path/foofoo). So in your second ruleset ^/my/path can't match anything and the second rule gives the loop. (Just a tangentially related fact.) –  aaz Feb 25 '11 at 18:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The confusing feature of mod_rewrite is that, after an internal redirect, even one qualified with [L], the entire set of rules is processed again from the beginning.

So you redirect a nonexistent path to index.php, but then the rules for adding a slash kick in and you don't get the result you want.

In your case you simply need to put the file nonexistence condition on both of the redirect rules:

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule [^/]$ %{REQUEST_URI}/ [L,R]

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-f
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} !-d
RewriteRule ^ /my/path/index.php [L]

Or maybe move this condition to the top of the file:

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -f [OR]
RewriteCond %{REQUEST_FILENAME} -d
RewriteRule ^ - [L]   # redirect to same location to stop processing

RewriteRule [^/]$ %{REQUEST_URI}/ [L,R]

RewriteRule ^ /my/path/index.php [L]

There's also an undocumented trick to stop processing after an internal redirect which should make more complex rulesets easier to write – using the REDIRECT_STATUS environment variable, which is set after an internal redirect:

RewriteCond %{ENV:REDIRECT_STATUS} .  # <-- that's a dot there
RewriteRule ^ - [L]   # redirect to same location to stop processing

RewriteRule [^/]$ %{REQUEST_URI}/ [L,R]

RewriteRule ^ /my/path/index.php [L]
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @aaz the second one works! –  JDavis Feb 25 '11 at 19:08

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