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I have a thread that calls the wait method and can only be awoken when the notify method called from some other class:

 class ThreadA {
     public static void main(String [] args) {
         ThreadB b = new ThreadB();
         b.start();

         synchronized(b) {
             try {
                 System.out.println("Waiting for b to complete...");
                 b.wait();
             } catch (InterruptedException e) {}
             System.out.println("Total is: " + b.total);
         }
     }
 }

class ThreadB extends Thread {
    int total;
    public void run() {
        synchronized(this) {
            for(int i=0;i<100;i++) {
                total += i;
            }
            notify();
        }
    }
}

In the above code if the synchronized block in main, if the ThreadA does not execute first and instead the other synchronization block executing and completes to completion, then ThreadA executes its synchronized block and calls wait, what is going to happen and how it will be notified again?

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@templatetypedef: thanks for reformatting (I just started to do this). –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 25 '11 at 18:39
2  
notify() is reserved for the Gods. Mere mortals should use notifyAll(). –  Julius Davies Feb 25 '11 at 19:34
    
@Julius Davies, ParkSuppot.park/unpark is closer to the gods, notify is still very noobish :) –  bestsss Feb 25 '11 at 19:49
    
@bestsss Explain yourself. Do you mean park/unpark is more efficient than wait/notify? –  Pacerier Mar 8 '12 at 17:48
    
@Pacerier, sort of although it has been tweaked at a point and now it takes an extra memory fence. Park/Unpark requires no explicit sync (this is good, although it still may use native mutex) but proper use may require queues. For simple cases, park/unpark is usually superior to wait/notify but there is no notifyAll (see remark about queues). Also no need to wrap everything in try/catch(InterruptedException) –  bestsss Apr 14 '12 at 19:13
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7 Answers

If ThreadB gets through its synchronized block before ThreadA does, then ThreadA will block indefinitely on the call to wait. It won't somehow be notified that the other thread has already completed.

The problem is that you're trying to use wait and notify in ways that they are not designed to be used. Usually, wait and notify are used to have one thread wait until some condition is true, and then to have another thread signal that the condition may have become true. For example, they're often used as follows:

/* Producer */
synchronized (obj) {
    /* Make resource available. */
    obj.notify();
}

/* Consumer */
synchronized (obj) {
    while (/* resource not available */)
        obj.wait();

    /* Consume the resource. */
}

The reason that the above code works is that it doesn't matter which thread runs first. If the producer thread creates a resource and no one is waiting on obj, then when the consumer runs it will enter the while loop, notice that the resource has been produced, and then skip the call to wait. It can then consume the resource. If, on the other hand, the consumer runs first, it will notice in the while loop that the resource is not yet available and will wait for some other object to notify it. The other thread can then run, produce the resource, and notify the consumer thread that the resource is available. Once the original thread is awoken, it will notice that the condition of the loop is no longer true and will consume the resource.

More generally, Java suggests that you always call wait in a loop because of spurious notifications in which a thread can wake up from a call to wait without ever being notified of anything. Using the above pattern can prevent this.

In your particular instance, if you want to ensure that ThreadB has finished running before ThreadA executes, you may want to use Thread.join(), which explicitly blocks the calling thread until some other thread executes. More generally, you may want to look into some of the other synchronization primitives provided by Java, as they often are much easier to use than wait and notify.

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sir i had a doubt how to get to know which threads owns the lock on a particular object.can u clarify me please –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 19:22
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You could loop and wait until the total has been computed :

synchronized(b) {
   while (total == 0) {
       b.wait();
   }
}

You could also use a higher-level abstraction like a CountDownLatch.

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new CountDownLatch(1) is usually my favorite, condition to wait upon. –  bestsss Feb 25 '11 at 20:42
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It is possible for ThreadB's run method to complete before you enter the synchronized block in ThreadA.main. In that situation, since the notify call has happened before you started waiting, ThreadA will block forever on the wait call.

A simple workaround would be to grab the lock on b in main before you start the second thread to ensure the wait happens first.

ThreadB b = new ThreadB();
synchronized(b) {
    b.start();
    ...
    b.wait();
}
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That's a good suggestion to ensure that ThreadB doesn't start working until A has the lock. However, you still want to have a loop inside the synchronized block to check that some success condition is true, instead of relying on the notify() call. This can be triggered by a spurious wakeup (books.google.com/…) –  Jesse Barnum Feb 25 '11 at 18:50
    
good suggestion to grab the lock –  satheesh Feb 25 '11 at 18:59
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You probably want to use a java.util.concurrent.Semaphore for this.

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1) You need to add some flag that is used to communicate between the threads, so that B can signal to A when it is finished. A simple boolean variable is fine, as long as it is only read and written within the synchronized blocks.

synchronized(this) {
    for(int i=0;i<100;i++) {
        total += i;
    }
    isDone = true;
    notify();
}

2) A needs to loop while waiting. So if your boolean variable was called isDone, and was set to true by threadB, then threadA should have some code like this:

synchronized(b) {
    System.out.println("Waiting for b to complete...");
    while( ! isDone ) b.wait();
}

In this particular case, there's actually no reason to have the synchronized block in A - since threadB doesn't do anything after it finishes running, and A doesn't do anything except wait for B, threadA could simply call b.join() to block until it finishes. I assume that your actual use case is more complex than this.

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the 2nd snippet must be while(! b .isDone ) b.wait(); –  bestsss Feb 25 '11 at 20:29
    
I don't think that it needs to be b.isDone. The boolean variable does not need to exist in the b thread, it is OK to have it in the parent class. Nor does it need to be marked as volatile, since all reads and writes to it happen in synchronized blocks with the same lock object. If I'm wrong about that, please let me know the details why. [I just re-read my post, and I think I see the confusion - I'm assuming that isDone is defined in the parent class, not in b] –  Jesse Barnum Feb 25 '11 at 21:59
    
the parent class is java.lang.Thread. Unless you are using some outer class where isDone is defined the code will not compile. Other than that as long as b instance and isDone are in bijection the code is ok (so the best place of isDone is in the class of b). No need for volatile if you to access them under the same lock. –  bestsss Feb 26 '11 at 0:23
    
Ok, I see what you mean. I was assuming that ThreadB was an inner class of ThreadA, in which an instance variable in ThreadA would work, but re-reading the code, there's no indication that ThreadB is an inner class. –  Jesse Barnum Feb 26 '11 at 13:10
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Why to make that complex ? Just use join() function of Thread.

ThreadB b = new ThreadB();
b.start();
b.join();
// now print b.total
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do not synchronized(thread), don't do it, do not synchronized(thread).. repat: no synchronized(thread) :)

And if you need to wait for the thread 'b' to finish, use b.join(), now your code is free to hang in b.wait()

--

Hopefully the source below can grant you an insight while sync(thread)/notify() I consider bad practice. (cut-cut)

Enjoy


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Java sources (incl), called in init(), effectively called by any java c-tor, since java 1.5

private static **synchronized int** nextThreadNum() {
return threadInitNumber++;
}

//join (the method w/ nanos only increase millis by one, if nanos>500000, millis==0 and nanos>0

public final **synchronized** void join(long millis) 
throws InterruptedException {
long base = System.currentTimeMillis();
long now = 0;

if (millis < 0) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("timeout value is negative");
}

if (millis == 0) {
    while (isAlive()) {
    wait(0);
    }
} else {
    while (isAlive()) {
    long delay = millis - now;
    if (delay <= 0) {
        break;
    }
    wait(delay);
    now = System.currentTimeMillis() - base;
    }
}
}


public **synchronized** void start() {
    /**
 * This method is not invoked for the main method thread or "system"
 * group threads created/set up by the VM. Any new functionality added 
 * to this method in the future may have to also be added to the VM.
 *
 * A zero status value corresponds to state "NEW".
     */
    if (threadStatus != 0)
        throw new IllegalThreadStateException();
    group.add(this);
    start0();
    if (stopBeforeStart) {
    stop0(throwableFromStop);
}
}

//stop1 is called after stop ensures proper priviledges

private final **synchronized** void stop1(Throwable th) {
SecurityManager security = System.getSecurityManager();
if (security != null) {
    checkAccess();
    if ((this != Thread.currentThread()) ||
    (!(th instanceof ThreadDeath))) {
    security.checkPermission(SecurityConstants.STOP_THREAD_PERMISSION);
    }
}
    // A zero status value corresponds to "NEW"
if (threadStatus != 0) {
    resume(); // Wake up thread if it was suspended; no-op otherwise
    stop0(th);
} else {

        // Must do the null arg check that the VM would do with stop0
    if (th == null) {
    throw new NullPointerException();
    }

        // Remember this stop attempt for if/when start is used
    stopBeforeStart = true;
    throwableFromStop = th;
    }
}
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2  
This answer does not provide any justification as to why you should not synchronize on the other thread object, nor does it answer the original question in any detail. –  templatetypedef Feb 25 '11 at 18:44
    
templatetypede, b/c join and join() and start() use sync. You don't want to mess w/ them (usually). And the answer is exact: use b.join() –  bestsss Feb 25 '11 at 18:47
    
if you use sync(thread)/notify() you mess up w/ any waiting join on that condition. –  bestsss Feb 25 '11 at 18:48
1  
@bestsss- Synchronizing on the Thread class object is not the same as synchronizing on individual Thread objects; the two are different entities. Also, I pulled up the source for the Thread class, but the start and join methods are marked native and so I can't see the implementation. I also can't seem to find something on Google that says that threads lock the Thread.class object, and the JLS special-cases Thread.join as a way of enforcing happens-before, so I'm not sure that synchronizing on the Thread class is the reason for happens-before. –  templatetypedef Feb 25 '11 at 19:07
2  
Maybe write it like this: Because of a bug in timed join it is not advisable to use the Thread object as a lock object for other uses instead of your categorical do not synchronized(thread), don't do it, do not synchronized(thread).. repat: no synchronized(thread). –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 25 '11 at 19:54
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