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I have created a query that uses a left join. For reasons I don't understand it will join two dissimilar length strings as if they are equal. An example would be:

Left column = "351-561"
Right Column = "351-561-35C"
Result = Joined as equal.

My workaround has been to right pad the strings to the same length. I don't understand though why those two strings would be treated as equal.

Is there some mechanism in the syntax that would change that behavior?

D.

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1  
What database product and version? – Thomas Feb 25 '11 at 20:03
    
What data types are they? Can you edit your post to include the sql? – adam0101 Feb 25 '11 at 20:03
    
they are not equal at all. could you show your data and your query? – Andrey Feb 25 '11 at 20:03
    
The only reason I could think of would be if the right column was being implicitly cast to char(7) not sure of any product that would do that. – Martin Smith Feb 25 '11 at 20:06
    
Is one of the tables in the join a temp table with the length set to 7 causing the value to be truncated? – adam0101 Feb 25 '11 at 20:09
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks like you may well need to use the == operator in Visual Fox Pro

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WTF! That was the problem. Thanks Martin. I sure don't get why a single = would change the behavior in that way. I would think that if it was interpreted as an assignment operator I would get WAY more matches than just the dissimilar length strings. Hmmph. Anyway thanks for setting me straight. D. – Donovan Feb 25 '11 at 20:22
    
@Donovan - WTF indeed. I don't think it treats it as assignment I think the default behaviour is just odd. SET ANSI ON might also work from looking at this KB article – Martin Smith Feb 25 '11 at 20:24

In Visual FoxPro, the = operator means equal. The == operator means "exactly equal". In other words, the == operator compares the size and value of each expression. For example:

* Returns .T. because the first 3 characters on the left match the right.
? "123" = "12345"

* Returns .F. because the expression sizes are not equal.
? "123" == "12345"


That being said, the only reason I can think a JOIN would fail is because the columns you are joining on are not the same size. For example, this query only returns the 555-1234 record because a CHAR column is automatically padded right with spaces.

CREATE CURSOR "MyLeft" (LeftPK I, LeftCode C(20))
INSERT INTO "MyLeft" VALUES(1, "351-561")
INSERT INTO "MyLeft" VALUES(2, "555-1234")

CREATE CURSOR "MyRight" (RightPK I, RightCode C(20))
INSERT INTO "MyRight" VALUES(1, "351-561-35C")
INSERT INTO "MyRight" VALUES(2, "555-1234")

SELECT MyLeft.*, MyRight.* FROM "MyLeft" JOIN "MyRight" ON LeftCode = RightCode


Whereas this query returns both records because the column type is VARCHAR.

CREATE CURSOR "MyLeft" (LeftPK I, LeftCode V(20))
INSERT INTO "MyLeft" VALUES(1, "351-561")
INSERT INTO "MyLeft" VALUES(2, "555-1234")

CREATE CURSOR "MyRight" (RightPK I, RightCode V(20))
INSERT INTO "MyRight" VALUES(1, "351-561-35C")
INSERT INTO "MyRight" VALUES(2, "555-1234")

SELECT MyLeft.*, MyRight.* FROM "MyLeft" JOIN "MyRight" ON LeftCode = RightCode


share|improve this answer
    
That's quite helpful to have the CHAR vs VARCHAR behavior explained. My original JOIN used alltrim() on both comparison values. That seems a bit misplaced now. It looks like == itself would have done the job. – Donovan Mar 1 '11 at 6:43

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