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recently some distributions started to pack the vmlinuz file together with the initrd in an "ELF-Boot" imagine that arguably has some advantages. Well, I need to compile a new kernel using the old format for the vmlinuz file. Does anyone know how can I achieve this? I'm using Oracle Enterprise Linux and if I run, for example, "make bzImage", the result is an ELF file that I cannot use.

Alternatively, is there a way to unpack an ELF-Boot image and extract the conventional vmlinuz file?

To clarify, what I get now when I do a "file /boot/vmlinuz" is:

vmlinuz: ELF 64-bit LSB shared object, AMD x86-64, version 1, stripped

What I want to obtain, however, is something like:

vmlinuz: Linux/x86 Kernel, Setup Version 0x20a, bzImage, Version 2.6.37, Version 2.6.37-40, RO-rootFS, root_dev 0x301, swap_dev 0x4, Normal VGA

Thanks for any help!

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2 Answers 2

1.Modify the Makefile and add -O binary to the objcopy cmd, such as follow:

in linux-3.7.4/arch/x86/boot/compressed/Makefile:

OBJCOPYFLAGS_vmlinux.bin := -R .comment -S **-O binary**

    $(obj)/vmlinux.bin: vmlinux FORCE 

        $(call if_changed,objcopy)

2.Comment parse_elf, such as follow:

in linux-3.7.4/arch/x86/boot/compressed/misc.c

asmlinkage void decompress_kernel(...)

{

    ...

    decompress(input_data, input_len, ...);

    /* parse_elf(output); */

    ...

}
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Your code seems to be a bit unproperly formatted, maybe, you might try to improve this. –  Samoth Oct 28 '13 at 8:51

Linux uses ELF kernel images for quite some time, this is not some recent development. So why do you think you can't use a ELF image?

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I use clusterworx to manage the cluster nodes. For an image to work with clusterworx, when you do "file vmlinuz" you should get something like: "vmlinuz: Linux/x86 Kernel, Setup Version 0x20a, bzImage, Version 2.6.37, Version 2.6.37-40, RO-rootFS, root_dev 0x301, swap_dev 0x4, Normal VGA", but what I get is: "vmlinuz: ELF 64-bit LSB shared object, AMD x86-64, version 1, stripped". –  Trixl Feb 26 '11 at 16:24
1  
Well, after compiling the kernel, the kernel image is not that vmlinuz file in the kernel source base directory you end up with. It's the file arch/${YOUR_ARCHITECTURE}/boot/bzImage –  datenwolf Feb 26 '11 at 17:18
    
Unfortunately all the candidate file files I can find somewhere in the source tree (vmlinuz, bzImage, etc.) all report to be ELF... –  Trixl Feb 27 '11 at 10:31
    
That's because the Linux kernel is linked into a ELF image. It's that way since the late 2.2.x kernels, i.e. for over 10 years, now. –  datenwolf Feb 27 '11 at 11:01

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