Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to be able to access a property or member of a class by name. I'm fine if it's a property:

  PropertyInfo prop = object.GetType().GetProperty(propertyName);
  object propValue = prop.GetValue(object, null);

Things seem a little trickier if it is a member/field. AFter studying GetMember and trying a bunch of different stuff I can't figure out how to just get a reference to the object the same way it would be returned from GetProperty, if it was a property.

The other question is, is this the right way to accomplish this? In reading about reflection, it seems to have a lot of overhead. Is this just in comparison to not using reflection, or is it significant enough that I should think twice about developing something that will be doing this a lot, and what alternatives do I have, if any, to obtain a reference to a member of a class by name only?

Thanks for any insight. If it makes any difference, my goal is to be able to serialize an arbitrary named property or member of a class.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use GetField instead of GetProperty if you want to retrieve a field.

FieldInfo field = object.GetType().GetField(fieldName);
object fieldValue = field.GetValue(Context.Parent);

or is it significant enough that I should think twice about developing something that will be doing this a lot, and what alternatives do I have, if any, to obtain a reference to a member of a class by name only?

It is definitely expensive, but I'd profile it to determine if you will have a performance issue.

The other main option(s) is to build some form of dictionary yourself that maps "names" to values. This can be a direct dictionary mapping to the value, or a dictionary that maps to a delegate which retrieves the value. This does have the advantage in that you can make it work the same way for properties or fields, but each class needs to create the mapping. (This can, however, potentially be done via reflection at construction time.)

If it makes any difference, my goal is to be able to serialize an arbitrary named property or member of a class.

I would recommend reviewing the built-in Serialization Support prior to rolling your own version...

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, just what I was looking for. This is serializing for Javascript, and yeah I'm using MS's already. Performance is not an issue at this point but I'm trying to consider scalability as I design this. The caching idea is probably quite applicable here - though this is for web applications. The properties will need to be accessed each time a page loads. I don't think caching delegates would work across page loads as the objects would not be the same instance. Any idea on a way to optimize or cache when the structure will persist, but not the instance? –  Jamie Treworgy Feb 25 '11 at 20:35
    
@jamietre: You could cache a delegate that takes the instance into account (statically per type), ie: Func<YourType, object>, and then pass the instance into the delegate to get the value... –  Reed Copsey Feb 25 '11 at 20:36
    
@Reed Copsley - I'll never need to access a given instance more than once. I will need to access different instances of the same signature many times, though. That is, once I get the info on a page load, I'm done with it for that particular page load. Wouldn't this result in an ever-growing cache because object is different each time? Perhaps I am misunderstanding you. –  Jamie Treworgy Feb 25 '11 at 20:41
    
@jamietre: If you have your type create a static cache of delegates (that map property names -> Func<YourType, object>), you could call that delegate on each page load, passing the instnace to the delegate. The cache would be a constant size (one per field/property/etc). –  Reed Copsey Feb 25 '11 at 20:44
    
I'm still being stupid, I apologize, and I do really want to understand this. Why wouldn't the delegate in the cache refer to a then-defunct object on a successive page load? –  Jamie Treworgy Feb 25 '11 at 20:46

If you're using C# 4.0 (released alongside the .NET Framework 4.0 and Visual Studio 2010), there's the new dynamic keyword that will simplify things in your code:

dynamic myValue = anyObject;
string name = myValue.myField; // Resolved at runtime, not compile-time
bool result = myValue.myBooleanMethod(1, 2, 3); // Ditto

etc. My understanding is that this does more-or-less the same thing under the hood as using reflection and testing for the existence of compatible PropertyInfo/MethodInfo/etc. and then invoking them, so performance is still a concern, but it's certainly a lot more readable.

share|improve this answer
    
I am using 4.0 - but I need to access them by a name not known at compile time. –  Jamie Treworgy Feb 25 '11 at 20:44

What I came up with for caching, comments welcome.

    public static ConcurrentDictionary<Tuple<Type, string>, 
        Func<object, object[], object>> ReflectionCache
    {
        get
        {
            if (_ReflectionCache==null) {
                _ReflectionCache = new ConcurrentDictionary<Tuple<Type, string>,
                  Func<object, object[], object>>();
            }
            return _ReflectionCache;
        }
    } private static ConcurrentDictionary<Tuple<Type, string>, 
         Func<object, object[], object>> _ReflectionCache = null;

    public static object GetCachedProperty(object obj, string name)
    {
        Func<object,object[],object> del;
        if (!ReflectionCache.TryGetValue(Tuple.Create<Type,string>(obj.GetType(),
          name), out del)) {
            MemberInfo memberInfo = 
               (MemberInfo)obj.GetType().GetMember(name).GetValue(0);
            PropertyInfo prop = null;
            FieldInfo fld = null;

            switch(memberInfo.MemberType) {
            case MemberTypes.Field:
                fld = obj.GetType().GetField(name);
                break;
            case MemberTypes.Property:
                prop = obj.GetType().GetProperty(name);
                break;
            }

            if (prop == null && fld == null)
            {
                throw new Exception("No property or field named '" + name 
                 + "' could be found in the context parent.");
            }
            if (prop!=null) {
                prop= obj.GetType().GetProperty(name);
                del = prop.GetValue;
            } else {
                fld = obj.GetType().GetField(name);
                del = delegate(object cls,object[] index) {
                    return fld.GetValue(cls);
                };
            }

            ReflectionCache[Tuple.Create<Type,string>(obj.GetType(),name)]=del;
        }
        return(del(obj,null));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
For properties, you can use Delegate.CreateDelegate on the PropertyInfo's GetGetMethod, which will avoid the reflection overhead... –  Reed Copsey Feb 25 '11 at 22:44
    
Cool. Thanks again. I'm guessing there's still a benefit for fields since I'm only using GetValue and not GetField too. –  Jamie Treworgy Feb 25 '11 at 22:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.