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I have some binary data stream which passes geo location coordinates - latitude and longitude. I need to find the method they are encoded.

4adac812 = 74°26.2851' = 74.438085
2b6059f9 = 43°0.2763'  = 43.004605

4adaee12 = 74°26.3003' = 74.438338
2a3c8df9 = 42°56.3177' = 42.938628

4ae86d11 = 74°40.1463' = 74.669105
2afd0efb = 42°59.6263' = 42.993772

1st value is hex value. 2nd & 3rd are values that I get in output (not sure which one is used in conversion).

I've found that first byte represents integer part of value (0x4a = 74). But I cannot find how decimal part is encoded.

I would really appreciate any help!

Thanks.

--

Upd: This stream comes from some "chinese" gps server software through tcp protocol. I have no sources or documentation for clent software. I suppose it was written in VC++6 and uses some standard implementations.

--

Upd: Here is packets I get:

Hex data:
41 00 00 00  13 bd b2 2c
4a e8 6d 11  2a 3c 8d f9
f6 0c ee 13

Log data in client soft:
[Lng] 74°40.1463', direction:1
[Lat] 42°56.3177', direction:1
[Head] direction:1006, speed:3318, AVA:1
[Time] 2011-02-25 19:52:19

Result data in client (UI):
74.669105
42.938628
Head 100 // floor(1006/10)
Speed 61.1 // floor(3318/54.3)


41 00 00 00  b1 bc b2 2c
4a da ee 12  2b 60 59 f9
00 00 bc 11
[Lng] 74°26.3003', direction:1
[Lat] 43°0.2763', direction:1
[Head] direction:444, speed:0, AVA:1
[Time] 2011-02-25 19:50:49
74.438338
43.004605


00 00 00 00  21 bd b2 2c
4a da c8 12  aa fd 0e fb
0d 0b e1 1d
[Lng] 74°26.2851', direction:1
[Lat] 42°59.6263', direction:1
[Head] direction:3553, speed:2829, AVA:1
[Time] 2011-02-25 19:52:33
74.438085
42.993772

I don't know what first 4 bytes mean.

I found the lower 7 bits of 5th byte represent the number of sec. (maybe 5-8 bits are time?) Byte 9 represent integer of Lat.

Byte 13 is integer of Lng.

Bytes 17-18 reversed (word byte) is speed.

Bytes 19-20 reversed is ava(?) & direction (4 + 12 bits). (btw, somebody knows what ava is?)

And one note. In 3rd packet 13th byte you can see only lower 7 bits are used. I guess 1st bit doesnt mean smth (I removed it in the beginning, sorry if I'm wrong).

share|improve this question
    
What device is the stream coming from? –  Justin Feb 25 '11 at 21:26
    
This is a really sweet puzzle. –  ProdigySim Feb 25 '11 at 21:27
    
Yes please post the binary packet. Even if it's a chinese random-number-generator we should be able to come up with some crazy formula to derive that. :) –  eznme Feb 25 '11 at 22:17
    
you say: "I suppose it was written in VC++6" Do you have a VC-Project? Sourcecode would be ideal to figure this out hehe. If not, but you could give us a copy of the client-program: that would allow us to look at it in a debugger. –  eznme Feb 25 '11 at 22:33
    
Yes, being able to analyze the binary would probably be the most direct way to getting this information. –  ProdigySim Feb 25 '11 at 22:35

3 Answers 3

I have reordered your data so that we first have 3 longitures and then 3 latitudes:

74.438085, 74.438338, 74.669105, 43.004605, 42.938628, 42.993772

This is the best fit of the hexadecimals i can come up with is:

74.437368, 74.439881, 74.668392, 42.993224, 42.961388, 42.982391

The differences are: -0.000717, 0.001543, -0.000713, -0.011381, 0.022760, -0.011381

The program that generates these values from the complete Hex'es (4 not 3 bytes) is:

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    int a[] = { 0x4adac812, 0x4adaee12, 0x4ae86d11, 0x2b6059f9, 0x2a3c8df9, 0x2afd0efb };
    int i = 0;
    while(i<3) {
        double b = (double)a[i] / (2<<(3*8)) * 8.668993 -250.0197;
        printf("%f\n",b);
        i++;
    }
    while(i<6) {
        double b = (double)a[i] / (2<<(3*8)) *  0.05586007 +41.78172;
        printf("%f\n",b);
    i++;
    }
    printf("press key");
    getch();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! I'll give it a try. But I'm confused by these 8.668993, 250.0197, etc. Will it work on other locations (different from 74x43 and near)? While I cannot verify it on other locations, I will use your method. ;) –  DarkSerg Feb 25 '11 at 23:31
    
The 4 constants are derived from your first data packet and work reasonably well for the second data packet. I cannot verify that they will work for a completely different longitude+latitude because i dont have some crazy chinese gps thing to give me more data :) –  eznme Feb 25 '11 at 23:37
1  
@AKE this will probably only help you if your GPS device has the same encoding as the GPS device of DarkSerg. The problem was that his GPS device offered some bytes and he needed to know in which format. He gave us his real GPS coordinates so I could reorder and then scale the 0...2^32 to the latitude/longitude scale floats 0.0...360.0. –  eznme Jan 22 '13 at 9:55
1  
@eznme: Yes, I deduced as much. But the useful thing here is the approach you took, which can be replicated in other situations. Clever! Thanks for the reply. (BTW -- do you know what DarkSerg's last comment meant -- why did he think there is some other method? Is it because he didn't understand that you were using scale matching? –  Assad Ebrahim Jan 22 '13 at 10:59
1  
@AKE thanks. i think he expected the results to be within 1 meter. eg 0.000717 degrees is 80 meters. it might be because he added the 5-6 digits only afterwards which would probably give something much closer than 80 meters (although non-moving handheld devices have > 5m res anyway). –  eznme Jan 22 '13 at 13:02

Brainstorming here.

If we look at the lower 6 bits of the second byte (data[1]&0x3f) we get the "minutes" value for most of the examples.

0xda & 0x3f = 0x1a = 26; // ok
0x60 & 0x3f = 0; // ok
0xe8 & 0x3f = 0x28 = 40; // ok
0x3c & 0x3f = 0x3c = 60; // should be 56
0xfd & 0x3f = 0x3d = 61; // should be 59

Perhaps this is the right direction?

share|improve this answer
    
0x60 & 0x3f = 01100000 && 00111111 = 32 // not ok. –  DarkSerg Feb 25 '11 at 23:47

I have tried your new data packets:

74+40.1463/60 74+26.3003/60 74+26.2851/60 42+56.3177/60 43+0.2763/60 42+59.6263/60

74.66910, 74.43834, 74.43809, 42.93863, 43.00460, 42.99377

My program gives:

74.668392, 74.439881, 74.437368, 42.961388, 42.993224, 39.407346

The differences are:

-0.000708,  0.001541,  -0.000722,  0.022758, -0.011376, -3.586424

I re-used the 4 constants i derived from your first packet as those are probably stored in your client somewhere. The slight differences might be the result of some randomization the client does to prevent you from getting the exact value or reverse-engineering their protocol.

share|improve this answer
1  
-3.586424 is not "slight difference". There is another method... –  DarkSerg Feb 26 '11 at 0:11

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