Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two lists of the same type. That type does not have an identifier or any other guaranteed way to programatically distinguish.

  • List A: {1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 8, 8, 8}
  • List B: {1, 3, 5, 8}

I want the items from A that are not in B.

  • Desired Result: {2, 2, 8, 8}

If the types had identifiers, I could use a statement like the following...

var result = listA
      .Where(a => listB.Where(b => b.Id == a.Id).Count() == 0)
      .ToList();

So far, the only way I can do this is with a loop where I add each item the number of times it doesn't appear in the original list.

foreach (var val in listB.Select(b => b.val).Distinct())
{
  var countA = listA.Where(a => a.val == val).Count();
  var countB = listB.Where(b => b.val == val).Count();
  var item = listA.Where(a => a.val == val).FirstOrDefault();

  for (int i=0; i<countA-countB; i++)
    result.Add(item);
}

Is there a cleaner way to achieve this?

EDIT: Here is a simplified version of the object in the lists. It's coming from a Web service that's hitting another system.

public class myObject
{
  public DateTime SomeDate { get; set; }
  public decimal SomeNumber; { get; set; }
  public bool IsSomething { get; set; }
  public string SomeString { get; set; }
}

The data I am receiving has the same values for SomeDate/SomeString and repeated values for SomeNumber and IsSomething. Two objects might have equal properties, but I need to treat them as distinct objects.

share|improve this question
1  
Can we use LISP instead of C#? –  Shaded Feb 25 '11 at 20:54
2  
You say you have no way to compare items and then in your second example you compare them by val. Please explain. –  Kent Boogaart Feb 25 '11 at 21:00
    
@Shaded: Throw it out there, if there's no solution for C# then at least you've got something. :) –  Mayo Feb 25 '11 at 21:00
    
@Kent: No way to compare equality between two items that have the same properties - yet they are different in the business. –  Mayo Feb 25 '11 at 21:02
    
Please post the type definition you're talking about. I don't understand how you want to determine whether items are "same" (to remove them) if you say they can't be compared. Do you want to compare the references? –  Dan Abramov Feb 25 '11 at 21:05

6 Answers 6

up vote 9 down vote accepted

try this:

var listA = new List<Int32> {1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 8, 8, 8};
var listB = new List<Int32> {1, 3, 5, 8};
var listResult = new List<Int32>(listA);

foreach(var itemB in listB)
{
    listResult.Remove(itemB);
}
share|improve this answer
    
tested result returned: {2, 2, 8, 8} –  Kris Ivanov Feb 25 '11 at 21:07
    
I was just about to post a solution with Remove, you beat me to it though good job. +1 –  Marlon Feb 25 '11 at 21:07
    
@K Ivanov: I've got it working with your solution - thanks! –  Mayo Feb 25 '11 at 21:30

What am I missing?

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<int> a = new List<int>();
        a.Add(1);
        a.Add(2);
        a.Add(2);
        a.Add(3);
        a.Add(5);
        a.Add(8);
        a.Add(8);
        a.Add(8);
        List<int> b = new List<int>();
        b.Add(1);
        b.Add(3);
        b.Add(5);
        b.Add(8);

        foreach (int x in b)
            a.Remove(x);

        foreach (int x in a)
            Console.WriteLine(x);

        Console.ReadKey(false);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Collection initializers :-) –  Dan Abramov Feb 25 '11 at 21:20
    
:D but my post looks bigger! –  Dan Andrews Feb 25 '11 at 21:25

Are the objects same instances in both lists? If so you can use .Where(a => listB.Where(b => b == a).Count() == 0)

Or

.Where(a => !listB.Any(b => b == a))
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately I have no way to compare equality. It's literally an object with some strings/ints that can be repeated (although in real life they are unique objects). –  Mayo Feb 25 '11 at 20:57
    
== operator doesn't check equality, it compares references. It will return true for two references pointing at the same instance. –  Dan Abramov Feb 25 '11 at 21:18

You could sort both lists and then iterate through them both at the same time.

public IEnumerable<int> GetComplement(IEnumerable<int> a, IEnumerable<int> b)
{
    var listA = a.ToList();
    listA.Sort();
    var listB = b.ToList();
    listB.Sort();
    int i=0,j=0;
    while( i < listA.Count && j < listB.Count )
    {
        if(listA[i] > listB[j]) {yield return listB[j];j++;}
        else if (listA[i] < listB[j]) {yield return listA[i]; i++; }
        else {i++;j++;}
    }
    while(i < listA.Count)
    {
        yield return listA[i];
        i++;
    }
    while(j < listB.Count)
    {
        yield return listB[j];
        j++;
    }
}

I don't know if this is "cleaner", but it should be more performant on large sets of data.

share|improve this answer

This is a bit nasty but it does what you want. Not sure about performance though.

var a = new List<int> { 1, 2, 2, 3, 5, 8, 8, 8 };
var b = new List<int> { 1, 3, 5, 8 };

var c = from x in a.Distinct()
        let a_count = a.Count(el => el == x)
        let b_count = b.Count(el => el == x)

        from val in Enumerable.Repeat (x, a_count - b_count)
        select val;
share|improve this answer
1  
I just checked the implementation of Enumerable.Except: It doesn't work well with duplicates, so the result here would be {2}, instead of the requested {2,2,8,8} –  David Yaw Feb 25 '11 at 21:00
    
I edited the answer, it returns {2, 2, 8, 8} now. –  Dan Abramov Feb 25 '11 at 21:15

Why don't you implement your own equality comparer for your myObject:

public class YourTypeEqualityComparer : IEqualityComparer<myObject>
{
    public bool Equals(myObject x, myObject y)

    public int GetHashCode(myObject obj)
}

and then use it like this:

var list1 = new List<myObj>();
var list2 = new List<myObj>()
list1.RemoveAll(i => 
    list2.Contains(list1), 
    new YourTypeEqualityComparer()
);

now list1 contains result.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.