Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to replace all strings between, before and after <span style="[^"]+">.*?</span> tags that may be in string with span tags (no other HTML tags, just simple text) I have regular expression like this.

var span_re = /^(.+)(?=<span)|(?=<\/span>)(.+)(?=<span)|(?=<\/span>)(.+)$/g;
str = str.replace(span_re, '<span>$1</span>');

for this string

'foo<span style="text-decoration:underline;">bar</span>baz'

I got

'<span>foo</span><span style="text-decoration:underline;">bar<span></span>'

I want this:

'<span>foo</span><span style="text-decoration:underline;">bar</span><span>baz</span>'

I also try using: .+?, .*? and instead .+ capturing whole expression with no result.

I don't need a parser I don't parse XHTML and don't have self-contained tags.

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of RegEx match open tags except XHTML self-contained tags ...please just use an HTML parser already :( –  Matt Ball Feb 25 '11 at 21:05
1  
I don't want to parse XHTML I have only one tag type (span) and text before, between, after - why use something that complicated as a parser for this simple substitution, I line of code instead of ~1k for a parser. –  jcubic Feb 25 '11 at 21:45
    
@MattBall Yes, one should use a parser. Be that as it may: here’s the obligatory link; please link to actual answers, not to non-answers. –  tchrist Jun 8 '14 at 20:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Parsing HTML using regex is seldom a good idea, particularity in the context of a web browser. Here's a simple example that gets what you want, using jQuery:

Even if that HTML isn't already inside the DOM, it is easy to wrap it in a dummy element:

var wrapper = $('<div />')
wrapper.html('foo<span style="text-decoration:underline;">bar</span>baz');
wrapper.contents()
  .filter(
      function(){return this.nodeType == 3;} //select text nodes only
   ) 
  .wrap('<span />');

As a bonus, that will work well with other tags, and even if you have several <span> tags with free text between them.

Working example: http://jsbin.com/acigu5/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for answer but I already find solution for this - span tags was created by me when I substitute formating strings like this [[uib;color;background]text] for span tags (with basic style) so instead of use replace first I split the string and get text between formating strings and don't need to match tags. –  jcubic Feb 26 '11 at 20:19

You may be over complicating it. If you know you only may have a single <span>, no other tags and no unescaped > signs, you can use this simple regex:

s = s.replace(/^[^<]+|[^>]+$/gi, '<span>$&</span>');

This regex finds text before the tag (from the beginning, not <) or after the tag (not >, until the end), and wraps them with a <span>. $& in JavaScript regex replace stands for the whole match, or group 0 (on other flavors that may be \0 or $0).

Note that (?=<\/span>) from your original regex is a look-ahead, not a look-behind (JavaScript doesn't have look-behind. shame). That caused (.+) to match the closing tag and consume it, resulting in invalid HTML.

Working example: http://jsbin.com/acexu4/

share|improve this answer
    
Thank for this but I don't have one tag, but one tag type - so they may be meny of them but not nested. And good to know that JavaScript don't have look-behind for future usage. –  jcubic Feb 26 '11 at 19:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.