Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm getting this error: "PHP Parse error: syntax error, unexpected T_VARIABLE in /var/www/vhosts/... on line 66"

Here's my code:

function combine($charArr, $k) {

    $currentsize = sizeof($charArr);
    static $combs = array();
    static $originalsize = $currentsize; ###### <-- LINE 66 ######
    static $firstcall = true;

    if ($originalsize >= $k) {

        # Get the First Combination 
        $comb = '';
        if ($firstcall) { //if this is first call
            for ($i = $originalsize-$k; $i < $originalsize; $i++) {
                $comb .= $charArr[$i];
            }
            $combs[] = $comb; //append the first combo to the output array
            $firstcall = false; //we only want to do this during the first iteration
        }
    ....
    ....
}

Any idea what's wrong?

share|improve this question
    
why is $originalsize static if you overwrite it's value immediately on every function call? –  Philipp Flenker Feb 25 '11 at 21:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Quoting the manual (that page is about static properties, but the same applies for variables) :

Like any other PHP static variable, static properties may only be initialized using a literal or constant; expressions are not allowed. So while you may initialize a static property to an integer or array (for instance), you may not initialize it to another variable, to a function return value, or to an object.

You are using this :

static $originalsize = $currentsize;

Which is initializing with an expression -- and not a constant.


And here's the manual's section that says quite the same about static variables :

Static variables may be declared as seen in the examples above. Trying to assign values to these variables which are the result of expressions will cause a parse error.

And, just in case, here's about expressions.


In your case, to avoid that problem, I suppose you could modify your code, so it looks like this :

$currentsize = sizeof($charArr);
static $originalsize = null;
if ($originalsize === null) {
    $originalsize = $currentsize;
}

With that :

  • The static variable is initialized with a constant
  • If its value is the constant one, assign the dynamic value.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Pascal, excellent answer! You solution helps me retain the value of $originalsize from whatever it was set the first time the function was called. :) –  trusktr Feb 25 '11 at 21:42
    
You're welcome :-) Have fun ! –  Pascal MARTIN Feb 25 '11 at 21:43
    
That condition will return true on every test. Don't you think you should change static $originalsize = null; for static $originalsize; and perhaps test the value of $currentsize instead? –  dabito Feb 25 '11 at 22:29
    
dabito, $currentsize changes with each call of the function (it's recursive). $originalsize needs to be the same for always, starting with the first value it gets set to in that conditional statement. –  trusktr Feb 27 '11 at 8:21
static $originalsize = $currentsize; ###### <-- LINE 66 ######

You can't pass a variable as the default value of a static variable. Instead, do the following:

static $originalsize;
$originalsize = $currentsize;
share|improve this answer
    
Great answer, but Pascal's was more informational. The best answer are both put together. –  trusktr Feb 25 '11 at 21:36

To quote the php manual:

Like any other PHP static variable, static properties may only be initialized using a literal or constant; expressions are not allowed. So while you may initialize a static property to an integer or array (for instance), you may not initialize it to another variable, to a function return value, or to an object.

share|improve this answer

From php manual:

Like any other PHP static variable, static properties may only be initialized using a literal or constant; expressions are not allowed. So while you may initialize a static property to an integer or array (for instance), you may not initialize it to another variable, to a function return value, or to an object.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.