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I just wanted to know that what is the use of ZIP extension method in Linq.

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Are you referring to this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267698.aspx ? - What are you trying to accomplish? –  anon271334 Feb 25 '11 at 21:17
1  
@Lucifer:Thanks for the link –  user634871 Feb 25 '11 at 21:20
    
It's like the two sides of a zipper coming together. –  Kevin Panko Aug 5 at 18:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The Zip operator merges the corresponding elements of two sequences using a specified selector function.

var letters= new string[] { "A", "B", "C", "D", "E" };
var numbers= new int[] { 1, 2, 3 };
var q = letters.Zip(numbers, (s, i) => s + i.ToString());
foreach (var s in q)
    Console.WriteLine(s);

Ouput

A1
B2
C3
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Zip is for combining two sequences into one. For example, if you have the sequences

1, 2, 3

and

10, 20, 30

and you want the sequence that is the result of multiplying elements in the same position in each sequence to obtain

10, 40, 90

you could say

var left = new[] { 1, 2, 3 };
var right = new[] { 10, 20, 30 };
var products = left.Zip(right, (m, n) => m * n);

It is called "zip" because you think of one sequence as the left-side of a zipper, and the other sequence as the right-side of the zipper, and the zip operator will pull the two sides together pairing off the teeth (the elements of the sequence) appropriately.

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4  
Definitely the best explanation here. –  Maxim Gershkovich Oct 30 '12 at 4:36
    
Much clearer than the picked answer! –  nashwan Jan 29 at 18:07

It's a way of combining two sequences according to rules you define. From the MSDN article on the method:

int[] numbers = { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
string[] words = { "one", "two", "three" };

var numbersAndWords = numbers.Zip(words, (first, second) => first + " " + second);

foreach (var item in numbersAndWords)
    Console.WriteLine(item);

// This code produces the following output:

// 1 one
// 2 two
// 3 three

If you were to do this in imperative code, you'd probably do something like this:

var numbersAndWords = new List<string>();

for (int i = 0; i < numbers.Length && i < words.Length; i++)
{
    numbersAndWords.Add(numbers[i] + " " + words[i]);
}

If the usefulness of this isn't clear, consider any situation where you have two sequences whose elements relate to each other, but combining them requires some kind of logic. You can use Zip to take elements from each sequence and create a new sequence that can be anything you want:

class USState
{
    public string Name;
    public string Abbrev;
}

string ListOfStates(List<USState> states)
{
    return "States and their abbreviations:\n" + 
        string.Join("\n", 
            states.Select(s => s.Name)
                .Zip(states.Select(s => s.Abbrev), (nm, ab) => nm + ": " + ab)
                .ToArray()
            );
}
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The Zip method allows you to "merge" two unrelated sequences, using a merging function provider by you, the caller. The example on MSDN is actually pretty good at demonstrating what you can do with Zip. In this example, you take two arbitrary, unrelated sequences, and combine them using an arbitrary function (in this case, just concatenating items from both sequences into a single string).

int[] numbers = { 1, 2, 3, 4 };
string[] words = { "one", "two", "three" };

var numbersAndWords = numbers.Zip(words, (first, second) => first + " " + second);

foreach (var item in numbersAndWords)
    Console.WriteLine(item);

// This code produces the following output:

// 1 one
// 2 two
// 3 three
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string[] fname = { "mark", "john", "joseph" };
string[] lname = { "castro", "cruz", "lopez" };

var fullName = fname.Zip(lname, (f, l) => f + " " + l);

foreach (var item in fullName)
{
    Console.WriteLine(item);
}
// The output are

//mark castro..etc
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As others have stated, Zip lets you combine two collections for use in further Linq statements or a foreach loop.

Operations that used to require a for loop and two arrays can now be done in a foreach loop using an anonymous object.

An example I just discovered, that is kind of silly, but could be useful if parallelization were beneficial would be a single line Queue traversal with side effects:

timeSegments
    .Take(timeSegments.Count - 1)
    .Zip(timeSegments.Skip(1), (c, n) => new {Current = c, Next = n})
    .Where(zip => zip.Current.EndTime > zip.Next.StartTime)
    .AsParallel()
    .ForAll(zip => zip.Current.EndTime = zip.Next.StartTime);

timeSegments.Take(timeSegments.Count - 1) represents the current or dequeued items in a queue. timeSegments.Skip(1) represents the next or peek items in a queue. The Zip method combines these two into a single anonymous object with a Next and Current property. Then we filter with Where and make changes with AsParallel().ForAll. Of course the last bit could just be a regular foreach or another Select statement that returns the offending time segments.

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