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So, I recently had a brain fart and decided to write a logic solving algorithm for my Sudoku application. What I wrote works for a limited amount of grid values, but then the recursion stops way too soon.

What my methods do: addToThirdDimension(): A three dimensional array stores any possible values that can be put into the grid value at logicGrid[x][y]. This method refreshes the three dimensional array. It does this by testing values 1-9 in every grid index, and if it's valid, it adds that number to the array. If not, it sets that value to zero.

checkValues(): Checks how many possibilities are left in the three dimensional grid. It goes through the logicGrid and returns the number of non-zero values are in the grid.

checkSingleValue(int row, int col): Checks logicGrid[row][col] to see if there is one and only one value left in there (If there is one value left, it is the only possibility for the grid element at [row, col]). It returns the amount of non-zero values that are in that grid location.

getSingleValue(int row, int col): Returns the single number that's left in logicGrid[row][col]

immutableValues: A two dimensional boolean array that stores whether or not a specific grid element is immutable or not. If it is immutable, the solve method should not touch it.

public boolean solveWithLogic(){

    addToThirdDimension();
    if(checkValues() == 0){
        return true;
    }

    for(int row = 0; row < 9; row++){
        for(int col = 0; col < 9; col++){
            if(!immutableValues[row][col]){
                if(checkSingleValue(row, col) == 1){
                    sGrid[row][col] = getSingleValue(row, col);
                    setValues[row][col] = true;
                    addToThirdDimension();
                }
            }
        }
    }

    if(checkValues() != 0){
        solveWithLogic();
    } else{
        return true;
    }

    return false;
}

As usual, I can't see where I'm going wrong. After a certain number of tries, checkValues returns 0 even though there should be more possibilities. Here is the code for addToThirdDimension() as I'm sure that if something is wrong, it's in here.

sGrid is the main two-dimensional integer array that stores the values for the puzzle.

public void addToThirdDimension(){

    logicGrid = new int[9][9][9];

    for(int x = 0; x < 9; x++){
        for(int y = 0; y < 9; y++){
            for(int z = 0; z < 9; z++){
                logicGrid[x][y][z] = z + 1;
            }
        }
    }

    int[][] temp1 = sGrid;

    for(int row = 0; row < 9; row++){
        for(int col = 0; col < 9; col++){
            if(setValues[row][col]){
                for(int i = 0; i < 9; i++){
                    logicGrid[row][col][i] = 0;
                }
            } else{
                for(int i = 1; i <= 9; i++){
                    temp1[row][col] = i;
                    if(!isColumnValid(col, temp1) && !isRowValid(row, temp1) &&
                            !isQuadrantValid(row, col, temp1){
                        logicGrid[row][col][i-1] = 0;
                    }
                }
            }
            temp1[row][col] = sGrid[row][col];
        }
    }
}

The code isn't too efficient at the moment. I just want to get it working before I start minimizing solve times. Any help is greatly appreciated.

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You may want to post this at CodeReview: codereview.stackexchange.com –  DJClayworth Feb 25 '11 at 21:56
    
I don't know java well so I have a question. In line int[][] temp1 = sGrid; is temp1 a clone of sGrid or just a reference to it? –  Dialecticus Feb 26 '11 at 9:51
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first thing I would do is create a SudukoCell object that stores your possible values in it. Then create a SudukoBoard with a 2d array of SudukoCells. Also give it an array of SudukoAreas. One area for rows, one area for cols, and one area for blocks.

Add your suduko cells appropriately.

This will help you consolidate your legwork and prevent silly mistakes.

then every time you solve a number, you can go to the cells in each of its areas and remove the number you solved from them.

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I'll try and rewrite my code to fit your model. In the meantime, do you see where I went wrong? Or is my overall implementation of code just completely wrong? –  SkylineAddict Feb 25 '11 at 22:14
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