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I have a Swingworker that I sometimes need to cancel. If I execute and then cancel, it works as expected. If I run a new instance of that Swingworker and then try to cancel it, the cancel function is called, it returns true, but the "doInBackground" method runs fully without being cancelled. By fully, I mean the while loop in the the function the Swingworker thread runs completes (which I can cancel only the first time).

Let me know if I made my problem clear, it is such a strange behaviour that I just can't figure out.

Here is my code:

protected void firePlayButtonPlotWorker() {
    /*Cancel any previous plotWorker threads that may be running. The user might click the play
     * button again, so we ignore that if the thread isn't finished.*/
    if(plotWorker != null && !plotWorker.isDone())
    {
        System.err.println("Cancelling plot thread");
        plotWorker.cancel(true);
    }


    /*Create a SwingWorker so that the computation is not done on the Event Dispatch Thread*/
    plotWorker = new SwingWorker<Void, Void>() 
    {
        @Override
        public Void doInBackground() 
        {

            System.err.println("Plot Swing Worker Thread starting");
            playAudio(sceneManager.getScenes()); //Computation that requires an asynchronous while loop
            System.err.println("Plot Swing Worker Thread ended");
            return null;
        }

        @Override
        public void done() 
        {
            plotWorker = null;
        }
    };


    plotWorker.execute();
}

public void handleAudioEvent(AudioState audioState)
{
    switch (audioState)
    {
    case PLAY:
        firePlayButtonPlotWorker();
        break;
    case PAUSE:
        if(plotWorker != null)
        {
            boolean cancelBool = plotWorker.cancel(true);
            System.out.println("Cancelled? " + cancelBool);
        }
        break;
    case STOP:
        if(plotWorker != null)
        {
            plotWorker.cancel(true);
        }
        audioPlayerMarkerBean.setMarkerLocation(0);
        double[] coord = {0.0, 0.0};
        marker.drawMarker(coord);
        break;
    }
}
share|improve this question
2  
I think a key issue that we don't know yet is what is specifically going on in here: playAudio(sceneManager.getScenes()); How is your canceling a SwingWorker supposed to stop this method from completing? Does your while loop check a boolean and stop itself? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 25 '11 at 22:17
2  
I agree. The swing worker looks to be set up, executed, and canceled correctly so the key code is the background task itself. Without knowing how and if you check for cancellations or allow for interrupts, it's pure guesswork to try and diagnose the problem. –  gcooney Feb 25 '11 at 22:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Calling cancel with true as argument will interrupt the thread, using the Thread.interrupt method.

So if your thread is waiting, sleeping or joining, an InterruptedException will be thrown. Else, the thread's interrupt status will be set.

If you swallow the InterruptedException, the thread will continue until its end. If the thread is running (i.e. not waiting, sleeping or joining) when it's interrupted, it will continue running as well. You must regularly check the interrupted status of the thread (using Thread.currentThread.isInterrupted()) in your background task and stop executing as soon as it returns true.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the information. I naively assumed that calling cancel on my thread would cancel the work it was doing. Now I see that I need to not only cancel my thread, but check the state of the thread in code being run by that thread, and manually stop it when the thread is cancelled. If what I just wrote is incorrect, let me know. I get the expected behaviour now in my program. –  Bluebomber357 Feb 28 '11 at 16:25

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