Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Aliasing methods in Ruby is relatively straight-forward. A contrived example:

class Person
  def name
    puts "Roger"
  end
end

class User < Person
  alias :old_name :name
  def name
    old_name
    puts "Staubach"
  end
end

In this case, running User.new.name will output:

Roger
Staubach

That works as expected. However, I'm trying to alias a setter method, which is apparently not straight-forward:

class Person
  def name=(whatever)
    puts whatever
  end
end

class User < Person
  alias :old_name= :name=
  def name=(whatever)
    puts whatever
    old_name = whatever
  end
end

With this, calling User.new.name = "Roger" will output:

Roger

It appears that the new aliased method gets called, but the original does not.

What is up with that?

ps - I know about super and let's just say for the sake of brevity that I do not want to use it here

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't think Ruby will recognize old_name = whatever as a method call when it lacks an object reference. Try:

def name=(whatever)
  puts whatever
  self.old_name = whatever
end

instead (note the self.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that works. I also realized that there is pretty much no reason that the aliased version has to be a setter, I can just pass the parameter directly to it and it'll work. – jerodsanto Feb 25 '11 at 22:46
1  
See stackoverflow.com/questions/44715/… – Josh Lee Feb 25 '11 at 22:49

You need self.old_name = whatever, just plain old_name is a local.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

alias old_name= name=
share|improve this answer

Does the alias have to be a setter?

class User < Person
  alias :old_name :name=
  def name=(whatever)
    old_name whatever
  end
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.