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Suppose we want to apply a series of transformations, int f1(int), int f2(int), int f3(int), to a list of objects. A naive way would be

SourceContainer source;

TempContainer1 temp1;
transform(source.begin(), source.end(), back_inserter(temp1), f1);
TempContainer2 temp2;
transform(temp1.begin(), temp1.end(), back_inserter(temp2), f2);

TargetContainer target;
transform(temp2.begin(), temp2.end(), back_inserter(target), f3);

This first solution is not optimal because of the extra space requirement with temp1 and temp2. So, let's get smarter with this:

int f123(int n) { return f3(f2(f1(n))); }
...
SourceContainer source;
TargetContainer target;
transform(source.begin(), source.end(), back_inserter(target), f123);

This second solution is much better because not only the code is simpler but more importantly there is less space requirement without the intermediate calculations.

However, the composition f123 must be determined at compile time and thus is fixed at run time.

How would I try to do this efficiently if the composition is to be determined at run time? For example, if this code was in a RPC service and the actual composition--which can be any permutation of any subset of f1, f2, and f3--is based on arguments from the RPC call.

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2  
+1 I'd love to see what people come up with. –  templatetypedef Feb 25 '11 at 23:15
1  
You know that you can transform in place, right? –  Crazy Eddie Feb 25 '11 at 23:32
    
In this example, I used SourceContainer and TargetContainer, but the iterators could have come from input-stream and output-stream, which cannot be transformed in place. –  kirakun Feb 25 '11 at 23:36
    
@Crazy: it definitely depends on the types... –  Matthieu M. Feb 26 '11 at 11:11
    
@Matthiew - it actually doesn't. A semantically correct assignment operator is a requirement of any type used in a container in 03. Assignment or move in 0x. –  Crazy Eddie Feb 26 '11 at 19:47

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

EDIT: Working version at http://ideone.com/5GxnW . The version below has the ideas but does not compile. It supports run time type checking, and run time function composition.

The idea is to define a generic (unary) function class, and a way to compose them with run time type checks. This is done with a combination of boost::any, boost::function and the type erasure idiom.

#include <boost/any.hpp>
#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>


template <typename T>
struct identity
{
    T operator()(const T& x) { return x; }
};

struct any_function
{
    template <typename Res, typename Arg>
    any_function(boost::function<Res, Arg> f)
    {
        impl = make_impl(f);
    }

    boost::any operator()(const boost::any& x)
    {
        return impl->invoke(x);
    }

    static any_function compose(const any_function& f,
                                const any_function& g)
    {
        any_function ans;
        ans.impl = compose_impl(f.impl, g.impl);
        return ans;
    }

    template <typename T>
    static any_function id()
    {
        using boost::function
        return any_function(function<T(T)>(identity<T>()));
    }

    template <typename Res, typename Arg>
    boost::function<Res(Arg)> to_function()
    {
        using boost::function;
        return function<Res(Arg)>(to_function_helper(impl));
    }

private:
    any_function() {}

    struct impl_type
    {
        virtual ~impl_type() {}
        virtual boost::any invoke(const boost::any&) = 0;
    };

    boost::shared_ptr<impl_type> impl;

    template <typename Res, typename Arg>
    static impl_type* make_impl(boost::function<Res(Arg)> f)
    {
        using boost::function;
        using boost::any;
        using boost::any_cast;

        class impl : public impl_type
        {
            function<Res(Arg)> f;

            any invoke(const any& x)
            {
                const Arg& a = any_cast<Arg>(x);
                return any(f(a));
            }

        public:
            impl(function<Res(Arg)> f) : f(f) {}
        };

        return new impl(f);
    }

    impl_type* compose_impl(boost::shared_ptr<impl_type> f,
                            boost::shared_ptr<impl_type> g)
    {
        using boost::any;
        using boost::shared_ptr;

        class impl : public impl_type
        {
            shared_ptr<impl> f, g;

            any invoke(const any& x)
            {
                return g->invoke(f->invoke(x));
            }

        public:
            impl(const shared_ptr<impl>& f,
                 const shared_ptr<impl>& g)
                : f(f), g(g)
            {}
        };

        return new impl(f, g);
    }

    struct to_function_helper
    {
        template <typename Res, typename Arg>
        Res operator()(const Arg& x)
        {
            using boost::any;
            using boost::any_cast;

            return any_cast<Res>(p->invoke(any(x)));
        }

        to_function_helper(const boost::shared_ptr<impl>& p) : p(p) {}

    private:
        boost::shared_ptr<impl> p;
    };
};

Now, let's use standard algorithms and do this (this even works on empty sequences):

// First function passed is evaluated first. Feel free to change.
template <typename Arg, typename Res, typename I>
boost::function<Res(Arg)> pipeline(I begin, I end)
{
    return std::accumulate(begin, end, 
        any_function::id<Arg>,
        std::ptr_fun(any_function::compose)
    ).to_function<Res, Arg>();
}

and use the following to apply it

std::vector<any_function> f;
std::vector<double> v;
std::vector<int> result;

std::transform(v.begin(), v.end(), 
    result.begin(), 
    pipeline<double, int>(f.begin(), f.end())
);

You can even use boost::transform_iterator

typedef boost::transform_iterator<
    boost::function<double, int>, 
    std::vector<double>::const_iterator
> iterator;

boost::function<double, int> f = pipeline<double, int>(f.begin(), f.end());
std::copy(iterator(v.begin(), f), iterator(v.end(), f), result.begin());
share|improve this answer
    
Nice C++ code emphasizing the spirit of STL. Learned a few things as well, including local classes and use of boost::any to simulate dynamic types in C++. –  kirakun Feb 27 '11 at 6:23
    
Great trick with identity. We have transformation monoid if we want it. Did you invent it yourself? –  Oleg Svechkarenko Feb 28 '11 at 20:56
    
@Oleg: The accumulate algorithm is a little like fold in functional languages, and it needs a starting value. We are indeed working on the function level here, something C++ is particularly verbose at. –  Alexandre C. Mar 6 '11 at 22:50
template<class T>
class compose {
    typedef T (*f)(T);

    f first_func;
    f second_func;

public:

    compose(f one,f two) :
        first_func(one),
        second_func(two)        
    {}

    T operator()(T const &input) {
        T temp = first_func(input);
        return second_func(temp);
    }
};

#ifdef TEST

int f(int x) { return 8 + x; }
int g(int x) { return 2 * x; }
int h(int x) { return x * x; }

#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    compose<int> x(f, g);
    compose<int> y(g, f);

    std::cout << x(6) << std::endl;
    std::cout << y(6) << std::endl;

    typedef int (*func)(int);

    func funcs[] = {f, g, h};

    compose<int> z(funcs[atoi(argv[1])], funcs[atoi(argv[2])]);
    std::cout << z(6);

    return 0;
}

#endif

With C++0x, we should be able to use auto to eliminate having to specify the argument/return type. For the moment I've assumed they're the same, though in theory, you might like the ability to include conversions in the mix.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a variadic version of this that works with functors? –  kirakun Feb 25 '11 at 23:26
    
I think the OP is looking for runtime composition, which adds a level of complexity to the solution. –  fbrereto Feb 25 '11 at 23:27
    
@kirakun: I've never written one, but I don't see any reason it couldn't be written. This code is old enough that at the time, using a template at all was pushing the limits of compiler capabilities. –  Jerry Coffin Feb 25 '11 at 23:31
    
@fbrereto - this solution can be used during runtime. The only part that has to be known during compile time is the parameter and return type(s). –  Crazy Eddie Feb 25 '11 at 23:34
    
@fbrereto: I've added a demonstration of this doing run-time composition. @Crazy Eddie is exactly correct: all you need at compile time is the parameter/return type. If you wanted to badly enough, you could (theoretically) define an and and a not, and compose anything else you wanted from them... :-) –  Jerry Coffin Feb 25 '11 at 23:44

you should use a functor instead of function and pass needed transform functions into functor's constructor

something like

typedef int (*FunctionType)(int);

class Functor
{
    FunctionType m_f1;
    FunctionType m_f2;
    FunctionType m_f3;
public:
    Functor(FunctionType f1, FunctionType f2, FunctionType f3):
      m_f1(f1), m_f2(f2), m_f3(f3)
    {}
    int operator()(int n)
    {
        return (*m_f1)((*m_f2)((*m_f3)(n)));
    }
};

// ...

transform(source.begin(), source.end(), back_inserter(temp1), Functor(f1,f2,f3));

if you need variable number of functions then change Functor constructor signature to use vector of functions and fill that vector before calling transform.

share|improve this answer
    
Might be better with a vector of function pointers. –  Zan Lynx Feb 25 '11 at 23:35
    
@Zan yes, vector of function pointers would be better –  rmflow Feb 25 '11 at 23:36

Just define an iterator that does what you want:

template<typename T>
struct source
{
    virtual source<T>& operator++(void) = 0;
    virtual T operator*(void) = 0;
    virtual bool atend() = 0;
};

struct source_exhausted
{
};

template<typename T>
bool operator==(const source<T>& comparand, const source_exhausted&)
{ return comparand.atend(); }

template<typename T>
bool operator!=(const source<T>& comparand, const source_exhausted&)
{ return !comparand.atend(); }

template<typename T>
bool operator==(const source_exhausted&, const source<T>& comparand)
{ return comparand.atend(); }

template<typename T>
bool operator!=(const source_exhausted&, const source<T>& comparand)
{ return !comparand.atend(); }

template<typename T, typename iterT, typename endT>
struct source_iterator : source<T>
{
    iterT m_iter;
    endT m_end;
    source_iterator(iterT iter, endT end) : m_iter(iter), m_end(end) {}

    virtual source<T>& operator++(void) { ++m_iter; return *this; }
    virtual T operator*(void) { return *m_iter; }
    virtual bool atend() { return m_iter == m_end; }
};
template<typename T, typename iterT, typename endT>
auto make_source_iterator(iterT iter, endT end) -> source_iterator<decltype(*iter), iterT, endT>
{
    return source_iterator<decltype(*iter), iterT, endT>(iter, end);
}
template<typename TContainer>
auto make_source_iterator(TContainer& c) -> source_iterator<typename TContainer::value_type, decltype(c.begin()), decltype(c.end())>
{
    return source_iterator<typename TContainer::value_type, decltype(c.begin()), decltype(c.end())>(c.begin(), c.end());
}

template<typename TIn, typename TOut, typename TXform>
struct source_transformer : source<TOut>
{
    source<TIn>& m_src;
    TXform const m_f;
    source_transformer( source<TIn>& src, TXform f ) : m_f(f), m_src(src) {}

    virtual source<TOut>& operator++(void) { ++m_src; return *this; }
    virtual TOut operator*(void) { return m_f(*m_src); }
    virtual bool atend() { return m_src.atend(); }
};
template<typename TIn, typename TOut, typename TXform>
auto make_source_transformer(source<TIn>& src, TXform f) -> source_transformer<TIn, decltype(f(*(TIn*)0)), TXform>
{
    return source_transformer<TIn, decltype(f(*(TIn*)0)), TXform>(src, f);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure what auto and -> do in your code. –  kirakun Feb 27 '11 at 7:13
typedef int (*f_t)(int);

int f1(int a) { return a + 1; }
int f2(int a) { return a * 2; }
int f3(int a) { return a * a; }

int main()
{
    std::vector<f_t> ff = {f1, f2, f3};
    std::vector<int> source = {1, 2, 3, 4}, target;

    std::transform(source.begin(), source.end(), std::back_inserter(target)
    , [&](int a) { for (f_t &f : ff) a = f(a); return a; });

    // print target
    std::copy(target.begin(), target.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int,char>(std::cout,"\n"));
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice if C++0x could be deployed in production today. –  kirakun Feb 27 '11 at 7:11

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