Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

let's assume this is my custom object

public class myObject
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set;}
    public string Location {get;set;}
}

And I am returning a collection of myObject instances in a dictionary:

return new Dictionary<int, List<MyObject>>(); 

This collection is basically a list of my objects. the key refers to the parent class's Id which has one to many relationship with myObject class.

What is the best way to create a list out of dictionary?

Instead of using Dictionary<int, List<MyObject>>, I am planning to use:

public class myObject
{
    public int Id {get;set;}
    public string Name {get;set;}
    public string Location {get;set;}
    public int ParentId {get;set;}**
}

and returning:

return new List<MyObject> myObjects(); 

what is your suggestion?

share|improve this question
    
You should be able to do this with SelectMany... –  Ben Voigt Feb 26 '11 at 0:30
add comment

4 Answers

return myDict.Values.ToList();

You just need to get at the values, which is thankfully convenient.

EDIT:

Now that I understand a bit more of the problem, you want to set the Id field of each object to its key in the Dictionary (the parent id) before returning the list.

Well, first I would recommend that you simply set that property before adding it to the list in the first place. However, if you can't do that (for some unfathomable reason) you can simply iterate through the Dictionary beforehand and set the property:

foreach( var pair in dict )
{
    foreach( var myObj in pari.Value )
    {
        myObj.Id = pair.Key;
    }
}

return dict.Values.ToList();

Let me know if I'm missing something fundamental to your problem here.

share|improve this answer
    
Not true; he wants to have the ParentId (which is the key in the dictionary I suppose) as a property in the instances that are in the list. –  Frederik Gheysels Feb 25 '11 at 23:37
    
Ok, but it wouldn't change anything. The Values have their own ID property, and that's how they are paired up in the dictionary. If those are different then it's really a design problem and the ID should be assigned before they are added into the dictionary. –  Ed S. Feb 25 '11 at 23:38
    
Yep, I want to use parentid in LINQ to find relevant my object objects –  InfoLearner Feb 25 '11 at 23:39
    
I still don't get it. Why wouldn't you initialize them with the correct Id to begin with and then add them like so: dict.Add( myObj.Id, myObj);? –  Ed S. Feb 25 '11 at 23:40
    
no no Ed.S. The id is different for each MyObject. Think of it as a primary key of a table. And collection of MyObject is a value of the dictionary. The key is an integer value which links a group of MyObject values in a dictionary. –  InfoLearner Feb 25 '11 at 23:40
show 9 more comments

This collection is basically a list of my objects. the key refers to the parent class's Id which has one to many relationship with myObject class.

The key in the dictionary should be unique, so how can you create a one to many relationship in such case ?

Anyway, you'll first have to create a new class which is able to hold all the existing values, and the extra parentId:

        public class MyObject2
        {
            public MyObject2(int id, string name, string location, int parentId)
            {
                this.Id = id;
                this.Name = name;
                this.Location = location;
                this.ParentId = parentId;
            }

            public int Id
            {
                get;
                set;
            }
            public string Name
            {
                get;
                set;
            }
            public string Location
            {
                get;
                set;
            }

            public int ParentId
            {
                get;
                set;
            }

            public override string ToString()
            {
                return String.Format ("Id={0}; Name={1}; Location={2}; ParentId={3}", Id, Name, Location, ParentId);
            }
        }

Then, with a simple LINQ query, you can achieve what you want:

var dict = new Dictionary<int, myObject> ();
dict.Add(2, new myObject(1, "Test1", "Somewhere"));
dict.Add (1, new myObject (2, "Test2", "location"));

var result = dict.Select (kp => new MyObject2 (kp.Value.Id, kp.Value.Name, kp.Value.Location, kp.Key)).ToList ();

 foreach( var r in result )
 {
     Console.WriteLine (r.ToString ());
 }

 Console.ReadLine ();
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you want the key to be the ParentId and the value to be all the instances of MyObject that have that parent, maybe a Dictionary isn't the best data structure. Maybe you want to use a Lookup, which is basically a Dictionary that can have multiple values for a single key. The (possible) downside being that a Lookup is read-only. You create it once, and then use it to, well, look things up. But you can't modify it later, only recreate it.

Given a list of all the instances of MyObject, you'd create a Lookup like this:

ILookup<int, MyObject> myLookup = allObjects.ToLookup(x => x.ParentId);

Edit:

I see from comments on another answer that you're actually starting with a Dictionary<int, List<MyObject>> (the moral equivalent of a Lookup) and you want to get a flattened list of all the instances of MyObject. This is actually an easy one-liner:

IEnumerable<MyObject> allObjects = dict.Values.SelectMany(x => x);
share|improve this answer
add comment

Do you want to put the keys or the values into the list?

For the keys, do:

return new List<int>(dict.Keys);

For the values (which I think is what you're looking for) do:

return new List<MyObject>(dict.Values);

If you want both, you can use a Tuple, but you have to be using .NET 4.0 or higher.

List<Tuple<int, MyObject>> list = new List<Tuple<int, MyObject>>();
foreach (var i in dict.Keys) {
    list.Add(Tuple.Create(i, dict[i]));
}
return list;
share|improve this answer
    
i want both because i want to then find MyObject enteries which belong to the ParentId –  InfoLearner Feb 25 '11 at 23:38
    
Oh. Editing.... –  alpha123 Feb 25 '11 at 23:52
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.