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In my controller, the following works (prints "oké")

puts obj.inspect

But this doesn't (renders "ok\u00e9")

render :json => obj

Apparently the to_json method escapes unicode characters. Is there an option to prevent this?

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It's not a database problem. –  Michiel de Mare Feb 26 '11 at 0:08
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6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you dig through the source you'll eventually come to ActiveSupport::JSON::Encoding and the escape method:

def escape(string)
  if string.respond_to?(:force_encoding)
    string = string.encode(::Encoding::UTF_8, :undef => :replace).force_encoding(::Encoding::BINARY)
  end
  json = string.
    gsub(escape_regex) { |s| ESCAPED_CHARS[s] }.
    gsub(/([\xC0-\xDF][\x80-\xBF]|
           [\xE0-\xEF][\x80-\xBF]{2}|
           [\xF0-\xF7][\x80-\xBF]{3})+/nx) { |s|
    s.unpack("U*").pack("n*").unpack("H*")[0].gsub(/.{4}/n, '\\\\u\&')
  }
  json = %("#{json}")
  json.force_encoding(::Encoding::UTF_8) if json.respond_to?(:force_encoding)
  json
end

The various gsub calls are forcing non-ASCII UTF-8 to the \uXXXX notation that you're seeing. Hex encoded UTF-8 should be acceptable to anything that processes JSON but you could always post-process the JSON (or monkey patch in a modified JSON escaper) to convert the \uXXXX notation to raw UTF-8 if necessary.

I'd agree that forcing JSON to be 7bit-clean is a bit bogus but there you go.

Short answer: no.

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To set the \uXXXX codes back to utf-8:

json_string.gsub!(/\\u([0-9a-z]{4})/) {|s| [$1.to_i(16)].pack("U")}
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solved my json encoding issue, thanks very much –  Fizz Nov 11 '13 at 15:41
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You can prevent it by monkey patching the method mentioned by muu is too short. Put the following into config/initializers/patches.rb (or similar file used for patching stuff) and restart your rails process for the change to take affect.

module ActiveSupport::JSON::Encoding
  class << self
    def escape(string)
      if string.respond_to?(:force_encoding)
        string = string.encode(::Encoding::UTF_8, :undef => :replace).force_encoding(::Encoding::BINARY)
      end
      json = string.gsub(escape_regex) { |s| ESCAPED_CHARS[s] }
      json = %("#{json}")
      json.force_encoding(::Encoding::UTF_8) if json.respond_to?(:force_encoding)
      json
    end
  end
end

Be adviced that there's no guarantee that the patch will work with future versions of ActiveSupport. The version used when writing this post is 3.1.3.

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As much as I hate doing this, it totally solved my Emoji in JSON issues. Thanks! –  Sam Soffes Jun 9 '12 at 16:39
    
Still a problem in Rails 3.1.6, and this patch still fixes it. The Rails team really need to fix this issue in their JSON encoding; emoji is not something that is going away, especially now that it is part of the Unicode standard. –  poetmountain Jul 22 '12 at 0:35
    
see this for a less scary solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/683989/… –  vish Dec 17 '12 at 17:59
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That is the correct encoding. JSON doesn't requre Unicode characters to be escaped, but it is common for JSON libraries to produce output which contains only 7-bit ASCII characters, to avoid any potential encoding problems in transit.

Any JSON interpreter will be able to consume that string and reproduce the original. To see this in action, just type javascript:alert("ok\u00e9") into your browser's location bar.

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This guy is right :thumbsup: –  freedrull Sep 13 '12 at 19:40
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Characters were not escaped to unicode with this method in Rails2.3.11/Ruby1.8:

render :json => JSON::dump(obj)
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yes, that works in 1.8 and rails 2.3. good one. –  user589473 Jul 9 '13 at 23:43
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I have got a very tricky way to solve this problem. Well, if to_json did not allow you to have the correct code, then you could directly try to write :

render text: tags

render json: tags or render json: tags.to_json will always auto transfer the encoding style, but if you use render text:tags, then the string will stay as it is. And I think jQuery could still recognize the data.

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