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I know there is no concept of abstract class in ruby. But if at all it needs to be implemented, how to go about it? I tried something like...

class A
  def self.new
    raise 'Doh! You are trying to instantiate an abstract class!'
  end
end

class B < A
  ...
  ...
end

But when I try to instantiate B, it is internally going to call A.new which is going to raise the exception.

Also, modules cannot be instantiated but they cannot be inherited too. making the new method private will also not work. Any pointers?

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Modules can be mixed in, but I supposed you need classical inheritance for some other reason? –  Zach Feb 4 '09 at 17:41
2  
It not that I need to implement an abstract class. I was wondering about how to do it, if at all one needs to do it. A programming problem. Thats it. –  Chirantan Feb 4 '09 at 17:46
58  
raise "Doh! You are trying to write Java in Ruby". –  Andrew Grimm Aug 14 '11 at 23:30

15 Answers 15

up vote 27 down vote accepted

I don't like using abstract classes in Ruby (there's almost always a better way). If you really think it's the best technique for the situation though, you can use the following snippet to be more declarative about which methods are abstract:

module Abstract
  def self.included(base)
    base.extend(ClassMethods)
  end

  module ClassMethods
    def abstract_methods(*args)
      args.each do |name|
        class_eval(<<-END, __FILE__, __LINE__)
          def #{name}(*args)
            raise NotImplementedError.new("You must implement #{name}.")
          end
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

require 'rubygems'
require 'spec'

describe "abstract methods" do
  before(:each) do
    @klass = Class.new do
      include Abstract

      abstract_methods :foo, :bar
    end
  end

  it "raises NotImplementedError" do
    proc {
      @klass.new.foo
    }.should raise_error(NotImplementedError)
  end

  it "can be overridden" do
    subclass = Class.new(@klass) do
      def foo
        :overridden
      end
    end

    subclass.new.foo.should == :overridden
  end
end

Basically, you just call abstract_methods with the list of methods that are abstract, and when they get called by an instance of the abstract class, a NotImplementedError exception will be raised.

share|improve this answer
    
This is more like an interface actually but I get the idea. Thanks. –  Chirantan Oct 8 '09 at 9:15
1  
This doesn't sound as a valid use case of NotImplementedError which essentially means "platform-dependent, not available on yours". See docs. –  skalee Aug 30 at 15:30

Just to chime in late here, I think that there's no reason to stop somebody from instantiating the abstract class, especially because they can add methods to it on the fly.

Duck-typing languages, like Ruby, use the presence/absence or behavior of methods at runtime to determine whether they should be called or not. Therefore your question, as it applies to an abstract method, makes sense

def get_db_name
   raise 'this method should be overriden and return the db name'
end

and that should be about the end of the story. The only reason to use abstract classes in Java is to insist that certain methods get "filled-in" while others have their behavior in the abstract class. In a duck-typing language, the focus is on methods, not on classes/types, so you should move your worries to that level.

In your question, you're basically trying to recreate the abstract keyword from Java, which is a code-smell for doing Java in Ruby.

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2  
Abstract classes are a code smell, even in Java. –  Christopher Perry Mar 7 '13 at 5:06
    
@Christopher Perry: Any reasons why? –  SasQ Sep 3 '13 at 14:39
5  
@ChristopherPerry I still don't get it. Why shouldn't I want this dependency if the parent and sibling are related after all and I want this relation to be explicit? Also, to compose an object of some class inside some other class you need to know its definition too. Inheritance is usually implemented as composition, it just makes the interface of the composed object to be a part of the interface of the class which embeds it. So you need the definition of the embedded or inherited object nevertheless. Or maybe you're talking about something else? Can you elaborate some more on that? –  SasQ Sep 3 '13 at 18:23
1  
@SasQ, You don't need to know the parent class' implementation details to compose it, you need only know its' API. However, if you inherit you are reliant on the parents' implementation. Should the implementation change your code could break in unexpected ways. More details here –  Christopher Perry Sep 3 '13 at 19:04
2  
Sorry, but "Favor composition over inheritance" doesn't say "Always user composition". Although in general inheritance should be avoided, there are a couple of use cases when they just fit better. Don't follow blindly the book. –  Nowaker Feb 19 at 16:16

Try this:

class A
  def initialize
    raise 'Doh! You are trying to instantiate an abstract class!'
  end
end

class B < A
  def initialize
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
this is fine +1 –  Yar Mar 23 '10 at 18:56
18  
If you want to be able to use super in #initialize of B, you can actually just raise whatever in A#initialize if self.class == A. –  Mk12 Aug 1 '10 at 2:49

In the last 6 1/2 years of programming Ruby, I haven't needed an abstract class once.

If you're thinking you need an abstract class, you're thinking too much in a language that provides/requires them, not in Ruby as such.

As others have suggested, a mixin is more appropriate for things that are supposed to be interfaces (as Java defines them), and rethinking your design is more appropriate for things that "need" abstract classes from other languages like C++.

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14  
You don't /need/ an abstract class in Java either. It's a way to document that it is a base class and shouldn't be instantiated for people extending your class. –  fijiaaron Nov 25 '10 at 1:56
1  
IMO, few languages should constrict your notions of object-oriented programming. What's appropriate in a given situation should not depend on the language, unless there's a performance related reason (or something more compelling). –  thekingoftruth Mar 27 '13 at 20:32
3  
@fijiaaron: If you think so, then you definitely don't understand what abstract base classes are. They're not much to "document" that a class shouldn't be instantiated (it's rather a side-effect of it being abstract). It's more about stating a common interface for a bunch of derived classes, which then guarantees that it will be implemented (if not, the derived class will remain abstract too). Its goal is to support the Liskov's Substitution Principle for classes for which instantiation doesn't make much sense. –  SasQ Sep 3 '13 at 14:46
    
(contd.) Of course one can make just several classes with some common methods & properties in them, but the compiler/interpreter won't know then that these classes are in any way related. The names of methods & properties can be the same in each of these classes, but this one alone doesn't mean yet that they represent the same functionality (the name correspondence could be just accidental). The only way to tell the compiler about this relation is to use a base class, but it doesn't always make sense for the instances of this base class itself to exist. –  SasQ Sep 3 '13 at 14:52
class A
  private_class_method :new
end

class B < A
  public_class_method :new
end
share|improve this answer
4  
Additionally one could use the inherited hook of the parent class to make the constructor method automatically visible in all subclasses: def A.inherited(subclass); subclass.instance_eval { public_class_method :new }; end –  t6d Feb 26 '10 at 14:46
    
Very nice t6d. As a comment, just make sure its documented, as that is surprising behaviour (violates least surprise). –  bluehavana Mar 1 '10 at 16:10

My 2¢: I opt for a simple, lightweight DSL mixin:

module Abstract
  extend ActiveSupport::Concern

  included do

    # Interface for declaratively indicating that one or more methods are to be
    # treated as abstract methods, only to be implemented in child classes.
    #
    # Arguments:
    # - methods (Symbol or Array) list of method names to be treated as
    #   abstract base methods
    #
    def self.abstract_methods(*methods)
      methods.each do |method_name|

        define_method method_name do
          raise NotImplementedError, 'This is an abstract base method. Implement in your subclass.'
        end

      end
    end

  end

end

# Usage:
class AbstractBaseWidget
  include Abstract
  abstract_methods :widgetify
end

class SpecialWidget < AbstractBaseWidget
end

SpecialWidget.new.widgetify # <= raises NotImplementedError

And, of course, adding another error for initializing the base class would be trivial in this case.

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1  
EDIT: For good measure, since this approach uses define_method, one might want to make sure backtrace remains intact, eg: err = NotImplementedError.new(message); err.set_backtrace caller() YMMV –  Anthony Navarre May 10 '12 at 6:18

Personally I raise NotImplementedError in methods of abstract classes. But you may want to leave it out of the 'new' method, for the reasons you mentioned.

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But then how to stop it from being instantiated? –  Chirantan Feb 4 '09 at 17:42
    
Personally I'm just getting started with Ruby, but in Python, subclasses with declared __init___() methods don't automatically call their superclasses' __init__() methods. I would hope there would be a similar concept in Ruby, but like I said I'm just getting started. –  Zack Feb 4 '09 at 17:45
    
In ruby parent's initialize methods don't get called automatically unless explicitly called with super. –  Mk12 Jul 31 '10 at 15:17

If you want to go with an uninstantiable class, in your A.new method, check if self == A before throwing the error.

But really, a module seems more like what you want here — for example, Enumerable is the sort of thing that might be an abstract class in other languages. You technically can't subclass them, but calling include SomeModule achieves roughly the same goal. Is there some reason this won't work for you?

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Another answer:

module Abstract
  def self.append_features(klass)
    # access an object's copy of its class's methods & such
    metaclass = lambda { |obj| class << obj; self ; end }

    metaclass[klass].instance_eval do
      old_new = instance_method(:new)
      undef_method :new

      define_method(:inherited) do |subklass|
        metaclass[subklass].instance_eval do
          define_method(:new, old_new)
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

This relies on the normal #method_missing to report unimplemented methods, but keeps abstract classes from being implemented (even if they have an initialize method)

class A
  include Abstract
end
class B < A
end

B.new #=> #<B:0x24ea0>
A.new # raises #<NoMethodError: undefined method `new' for A:Class>

Like the other posters have said, you should probably be using a mixin though, rather than an abstract class.

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I did it this way, so it redefines new on child class to find a new on non abstract class. I still don't see any practical in using abstract classes in ruby.

puts 'test inheritance'
module Abstract
  def new
    throw 'abstract!'
  end
  def inherited(child)
    @abstract = true
    puts 'inherited'
    non_abstract_parent = self.superclass;
    while non_abstract_parent.instance_eval {@abstract}
      non_abstract_parent = non_abstract_parent.superclass
    end
    puts "Non abstract superclass is #{non_abstract_parent}"
    (class << child;self;end).instance_eval do
      define_method :new, non_abstract_parent.method('new')
      # # Or this can be done in this style:
      # define_method :new do |*args,&block|
        # non_abstract_parent.method('new').unbind.bind(self).call(*args,&block)
      # end
    end
  end
end

class AbstractParent
  extend Abstract
  def initialize
    puts 'parent initializer'
  end
end

class Child < AbstractParent
  def initialize
    puts 'child initializer'
    super
  end
end

# AbstractParent.new
puts Child.new

class AbstractChild < AbstractParent
  extend Abstract
end

class Child2 < AbstractChild

end
puts Child2.new
share|improve this answer

What purpose are you trying to serve with an abstract class? There is probably a better way to do it in ruby, but you didn't give any details.

My pointer is this; use a mixin not inheritance.

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Nothing wrong with your approach. Raise an error in initialize seems fine, as long as all your subclasses override initialize of course. But you dont want to define self.new like that. Here's what I would do.

class A
  class AbstractClassInstiationError < RuntimeError; end
  def initialize
    raise AbstractClassInstiationError, "Cannot instantiate this class directly, etc..."
  end
end

Another approach would be put all that functionality in a module, which as you mentioned can never be instiated. Then include the module in your classes rather than inheriting from another class. However, this would break things like super.

So it depends on how you want to structure it. Although modules seem like a cleaner solution for solving the problem of "How do I write some stuff that is deigned for other classes to use"

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I wouldn't want to do that, either. The children can't call "super", then. –  Austin Ziegler Feb 4 '09 at 20:24

2-lines gem : https://rubygems.org/gems/abstract

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There's also this small abstract_type gem, allowing to declare abstract classes and modules in an unobstrusive way.

Example (from the README.md file):

class Foo
  include AbstractType

  # Declare abstract instance method
  abstract_method :bar

  # Declare abstract singleton method
  abstract_singleton_method :baz
end

Foo.new  # raises NotImplementedError: Foo is an abstract type
Foo.baz  # raises NotImplementedError: Foo.baz is not implemented

# Subclassing to allow instantiation
class Baz < Foo; end

object = Baz.new
object.bar  # raises NotImplementedError: Baz#bar is not implemented
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