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I wrote a function to choose one word randomly from a lists of words. Here my code. But it cannot choose one word and cannot print. Please tell me what's wrong with my code.

def long(a: Int, b: Int): String = {
    var a = 5
    var b = 100
    for (i <- args(1)){
        if (i > a && i < b){
            val rand = new Random(System.currentTimeMillis())
            val random_index = rand.nextInt(new_sun .length)
            val result = new_sun(random_index)
            var guess = println("_ " * result.length)
            }
        else{
            println("You have to input the word with length of 5 < 100")
            }
        return i.toString
        }
}
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1  
Is this the hangman question once more? stackoverflow.com/questions/5055419/… –  Madoc Feb 26 '11 at 9:02
    
You are combining direct output (println) and returning a value (return). Why?. You are also shadowing the given parameters. This is like a mix between function, procedure and a code snippet. BTW: Why do you init Random by the current time? Techniques like that often devalve the random seed. Time is not anything special random you can add. –  v6ak Feb 26 '11 at 19:57
    
I don't agree about the usefulness of random(time) in a simple game, but I wouldn't reinitialize it in every loop run. Maybe outside the whole method. –  user unknown Jun 13 '12 at 2:53

3 Answers 3

There's a lot gone wrong here, so much that it's difficult knowing where to start. Taking one fragment at a time:

def long

Really, unbelievably bad name for a method!

def long(a: Int, b: Int): String = {
  var a = 5
  var b = 100

You're taking a and b as parameters, then immediately shadowing the names to create vars. Those parameters are useless.

for (i <- args(1)){
    if (i > a && i < b){
        ...
        }
    else{
        ...
        }
    ...
    }

This doesn't follow any recognised pattern for nesting of scope, it's also good practice to leave a space before the opening brace of a block. Worse still, the closing brace for the for block is aligned to look like the closing brace for the else clause. This is a guaranteed way to produce unmaintainable code. I'm an advocate of the so-called "one true bracket style", which you have your code formatted like this:

for (i <- args(1)) {
    if (i > a && i < b) {
        val rand = new Random(System.currentTimeMillis())
        val random_index = rand.nextInt(new_sun .length)
        val result = new_sun(random_index)
        var guess = println("_ " * result.length)
    } else {
        println("You have to input the word with length of 5 < 100")
    }
    return i.toString
}

Moving onward...

for (i <- args(1))

What is args(1), where does it come from? It must be an Option or some sort of collection to be used in a for-comprehension, and its contents must be of the same type as a and b for the i > a && i < b comparison to be valid. So I'm assuming that args(1) returns an Option[Int], a collection seems unlikely.

val random_index = rand.nextInt(new_sun .length)
val result = new_sun(random_index)

Same question. What is new_sun and where does it come from. The name tells me nothing. The space in new_sun .length is also very odd looking.

for (i <- args(1)) {
  if (i > a && i < b) {

is better written:

for (i <- args(1) if i > a && i < b) {

or even

args(1) filter (a to b contains _) map { i =>

But sadly, you can't do that, as the value i is used as the return value in spite of the guard condition.

Which also reminds me:

var a = 5
var b = 100
...
if (i > a && i < b) ...
else println("You have to input the word with length of 5 < 100")

This is checking that 5 < i < 100, or 6 <= i <= 99 in other words. The check doesn't match the error message.

var guess = println("_ " * result.length)

println returns Unit. There is absolutely no possible reason to assign this return value to a variable that is never used.

return i.toString

return statements are rarely needed in Scala, where the final expression evaluated will become the return value. You can't simply delete the keyword though, as it interacts with the other problems and would stop your code compiling.


Generally, you want to write your code so that if/else blocks, for-comprehensions, and other such constructs don't perform side-effects (such as calling println). Instead, you should try and make these blocks evaluate to a String and then pass this evaluated String to println at the end of your method.

You also need to be much more aware of what variables you have, where they come from, and how informative their names are.

and pay attention to your syntax/layout/formatting. Programmers have fought religious ways over less..

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2  
Thanks for writing this answer. I was dreading the thought of having to do this. –  Daniel C. Sobral Feb 27 '11 at 1:57
    
I got only so far, then decided it's probably best to stop before it got too overwhelming. Still not sure if I didn't already pass that point anyway... –  Kevin Wright Feb 27 '11 at 11:12

Well, why not simply write something like that to choose randomly a String in a List[String]?

def randomString(liste: List[String]) =
  util.Random.shuffle(liste).head

You could then create another function to print the result on screen

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Considering the implied size of the list, this would be highly inefficient. –  Sam Stainsby Feb 26 '11 at 12:55
1  
Hum... Your "highly inefficient" is "highly" exaggerated imho :) I've benchmarked my version against xs(util.Random.nextInt(xs.length)) and there is less than 1 TimeMillis on a 100 item list... –  jaco Feb 26 '11 at 14:20
    
This is a list of words from a file and could be very large. On a list of say of 100,000 I see a 5x to 10x times slowdown with your algorithm. –  Sam Stainsby Feb 26 '11 at 23:43

Your println doesn't attempt to print the result. Try:

println("result: " + result)

(note '+' is the correct string concatenation operator, not '*')

It is also unnecessary and inefficient to recreate rand each time in the inner loop.

share|improve this answer
1  
(plus it's probably a bad idea to call a function 'long') –  Sam Stainsby Feb 26 '11 at 6:20
    
It's hangman, that operator is quite right, he wants to print a number of underscores. There are also no loops anywhere in that code, technically speaking. if/else absolutely isn't a loop, whereas for looks like a loop but is really desugared to map/flatMap/filter –  Kevin Wright Feb 26 '11 at 20:36
    
Heh, crazy stuff! Thanks Kevin. –  Sam Stainsby Feb 27 '11 at 4:43

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