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Ok, so this has been messing with me. (double entendre?)

ignoring variable types since that's not the issue

Lets say you have a parent class, for example a book class, with variable ISBN. The constructor sets ISBN using this.ISBN = bla.

Now there's a child class. It has a constructor that calls the parent one inside it. First, how is the contructor formed? Like this? :

public kidsBook(ISBN, kidVariable) {
   super(ISBN);
   this.kidVariable = kidVariable;
}

Is that the right way to do it? If so that brings up the second question: the this.ISBN from the parent class, when the constructor from the parent is called in the child constructor does the this keyword refer to the child's version of ISBN?

It's really been confusing me and I bet the way I wrote it shows that confusion in spades.

Edit: Fixed code mistakes not related to the question.

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What you have there is not a constructor. –  Kirk Woll Feb 26 '11 at 3:35
    
How is it not a constructor? @kirk –  Portaljacker Feb 26 '11 at 3:38
    
constructors cannot have return type. –  Bala R Feb 26 '11 at 3:39
1  
Constructors do not have return types. And calls to the base constructor are not named, it's simply super(ISBN). What you have there is a normal method. –  Kirk Woll Feb 26 '11 at 3:40
    
Whoops, always forget the first part (return type). And the second was written that way out of ignorance (super.book). :P but thanks @kirk & @stack –  Portaljacker Feb 26 '11 at 3:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are on the right track. The answers to your questions are yes and yes.

Here's what the complete code would look like with right syntax

class Book {
    String ISBN;

    Book(String ISBN) {
        this.ISBN = ISBN;
    }
}

class KidsBook extends Book {
    String kidsVariable;
    KidsBook(String ISBN, String kidsVariable) {
        super(ISBN);
        this.kidsVariable = kidsVariable;
    }
}
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THANK YOU @stack! I was worried the this would refer to the class it was originally in. –  Portaljacker Feb 26 '11 at 3:35
    
And the same goes for methods that you overwrite on the child class! –  Miquel Feb 26 '11 at 3:38
    
The OP asks, when in the context of the super-class constructor, what this refers to. The correct answer is that it refers to the super-class, not the sub-class (child-class), and thus the super-class version of the field ISBN and not the sub-class version. –  Kirk Woll Feb 26 '11 at 3:44
    
I just realized that the question I'm asking is kinda pointless. Since the the this.ISBN will still be a part of the object of type kidBook anyway. :P Or am I wrong about that? –  Portaljacker Feb 26 '11 at 3:46
    
Meaning that the variable is part of the object anyway, so it doesn't matter which it refers to, right? @kirk@stack@miquel –  Portaljacker Feb 26 '11 at 3:47

The constructor would be:

public KidsBook(ISBN isbn, Foo kidVariable) {
   super(isbn);
   this.kidVariable = kidVariable;
}

Now, you are passing in the isbn parameter from KidsBook's constructor to the constructor of its superclass. The constructor of that superclass is:

public Book(ISBN isbn) {
   this.isbn = isbn;
}

In the end the isbn instance variable (equivalently, this.isbn) is equal to the original isbn passed into the KidsBook constructor.

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Here another example that hopefully clarifies some mechanics of java inheritance.

public class Book
{
  protected String isbn;

  public Book(String isbn)
  {
    this.isbn = isbn;
  }

  public Book()
  {
    // isbn not set
  }
}

class DoubleIsbnBook extends Book
{
  private String isbn;

  public DoubleIsbnBook(String isbn)
  {
    super(); // could be commented out, since super class' constructor is implicitly called anyway
    super.isbn = isbn; // since Book's isbn is protected, it's visible at this point
    this.isbn = isbn.toUpperCase(); // here we set DoubleIsbnBook's isbn
  }

  public DoubleIsbnBook(String isbn1, String isbn2) {
    super(isbn1); // if Book's isbn was private this would be the only way to set Book's isbn
    this.isbn = isbn2;
  }
}
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