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I am wondering if i included many import in my java program, would it affect the performance of my code (for example, program will be slower)? Is the logic behind the import in Java the same as include in C?

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3  
Using a import like import javax.swing.JFrame; helps the JVM quickly locate the class as that's so wrong. it might help the compiler a little (w/ indexing close to none) but it has ZERO impact on the JVM. Compiler is not JVM in any shape or form, messing both is plain lack of understanding how java works. Shame on considering the comment useful, it's just incorrect –  bestsss Feb 26 '11 at 21:11
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4 Answers

up vote 33 down vote accepted

would it affect the performance of my code (for example, program will be slower)?

No, it wouldn't affect performance of your code.

The binaries (the class files) does not increase in size as the import is not implemented with any cut-and-paste mechanism.

It is merely a syntacting sugar for avoiding to have to write for instance

java.util.List<java.math.BigInteger> myList =
        new java.util.ArrayList<java.math.BigInteger>();

Here is a little test demonstrating this:

aioobe@e6510:~/tmp$ cat Test.java 
import java.util.*;

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Integer> myInts = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    }
}
aioobe@e6510:~/tmp$ javac Test.java
aioobe@e6510:~/tmp$ md5sum Test.class 
523036e294b17377b4078ea1cb8e7940  Test.class

(modifying Test.java)

aioobe@e6510:~/tmp$ cat Test.java 


public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        java.util.List<Integer> myInts = new java.util.ArrayList<Integer>();
    }
}
aioobe@e6510:~/tmp$ javac Test.java
aioobe@e6510:~/tmp$ md5sum Test.class 
523036e294b17377b4078ea1cb8e7940  Test.class

Is the logic behind the import in Java the same as include in C?

No, an #include is a preprocessor directive and is implemented with a cut-and-paste mechanism.

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Not going to -1, but it can be more than syntactic sugar. –  corsiKa Feb 26 '11 at 6:20
    
Like what? My understanding is that with import vs without import would look differently only up until the IR in the compiler. (Check out my example in the updated answer.) –  aioobe Feb 26 '11 at 6:22
13  
+1 I like the use of the md5sum to drive the point home. –  user166390 Feb 26 '11 at 6:47
1  
@pst, an explanation what constant pool is would have suffice too –  bestsss Feb 26 '11 at 9:54
2  
@bestsss It would be a nice addition for a more holistic answer, but it's hard argue with "bit-identical output". –  user166390 Feb 26 '11 at 17:42
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... would it affect the performance of my code

Not in the slightest. In fact, the compiled classes (using imports or not) will be identical. An import is merely syntactic sugar that allows you to use a shorter name for an external class or (with a static import) class member in your source code. In other words, it allows you to write:

    Map map = new HashMap();

instead of

    java.util.Map map = new java.util.HashMap();

That is all.

There is potentially a small (tiny) difference in compilation times. But, AFAIK, something like import java.util.*; does NOT cause all of the java.util classes to be loaded by the compiler. Rather it just adds the names of the classes to the symbol table.

Having said that:

  • Unnecessary imports are a bad idea, because they clutter up the code and could mislead someone reading the code.
  • Wildcard imports (.*) can lead to unexpected collisions.
  • A lot of people (myself included) dislike wildcard imports because they prefer to see a list of the actual classes used.

Is the logic behind the import in Java the same as include in C?

No it is not.

An C / C++ include injects arbitrary C / C++ "code" into the source stream. This can include declarations and executable statements ... which can affect both performance, execution memory footprint and the size of the executable.

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It will have no impact on the ~run~time speed of your program.

It may have an impact on the ~compile~time speed of your program.

If you import java.util.*; it will load all of the java.util package into the compiler, which may increase the compile time when you .* an entire package for a single usage (although you should perform some profiling if it's going to be a concern.)

In addition to potential compile time issues, don't forget to consider the readability issues. Generally, I (and people I've talked with) find import pack.age.Class; to be more readable than import pack.age.*; - have a talk with your team of course before making a decision about this.

But the logic behind it is very different from #include and does not bloat the code. You may end up with more than necessary as you include dependency jars, but that's probably not a big issue.

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4  
Trying to keep compile time speed in mind when writing code seems like a Bad Idea. You go benchmark this, find out if there is any significant difference and come back with your results :-) –  aioobe Feb 26 '11 at 6:29
2  
For the speeds? Yes I do. javaperformancetuning.com/news/qotm031.shtml For the synchronized? There's one extra bytecode in the second one because there's a synchronized instruction, where as on the first one it's baked into the method modifiers (which in theory could make or break an inline/JIT, but incredibly unlikely). –  corsiKa Feb 26 '11 at 6:39
2  
Still no benchmark tests though. That would be interesting to have. –  aioobe Feb 26 '11 at 7:05
1  
-1: glowcoder, your reference merely states in passing that compilation "is probably more costly". I don't consider that sufficient justification to say "can greatly increase the compile time". What makes you assume that resolving class names even takes a significiant proportion of the compilation time? –  meriton Feb 26 '11 at 13:35
1  
@glowcoder - the fact that you cannot find any benchmark that quantifies the supposed extra cost of wild card imports should be telling you something. Certainly, it is telling me that the extra cost is likely to be a myth. And I can see why someone would downvote you for propagating myths. –  Stephen C Feb 27 '11 at 3:09
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import does not slow your program. It is better to have different kinds of classes in different packages and import them as needed. Improves code readability.

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what do you mean by "better to have different kinds of classes in different packages" thanks –  newbie Feb 26 '11 at 6:31
    
@newbie I meant it is a good design to have different classes in different packages and import them as necessary. Probably it is not directly related to your question. –  fastcodejava Feb 26 '11 at 23:32
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