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I have this:

public class MyClass<T>:  IView
{
        public View View()
        {
            return this;
        }
        public void Render(ViewContext viewContext, System.IO.TextWriter writer)
        {
            // We should cycle though all supported controls and generate HTML for them.
            // What about the validation binding?

            typeof(T).GetFields().ToList<FieldInfo>().ForEach(x => writer.WriteLine(x.FieldType + " is called " + x.Name + "</br>"));           
        }  


}

I get an error that it cannot implicitly cast this to a View. When I attempt a cast it fails. Is there any way to do this? Why does it fail?

EDIT: View implementation added. I trimmed too much out of the class. I apologize for not posting enough.

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I don't know too much C#, but this is a type of MyClass<T>? I don't see how MyClass<T> can be converted to view? –  user534498 Feb 26 '11 at 6:25
    
what is that it dosen't sem like a constructor..then why your method name is same as Return Type.. is this a typo.. As for answer may be bothe the T and View may not be compatible with each other.. but you havent even used T anywhere.. then you should be using specific class instead of generic.. if that is the case –  Shekhar_Pro Feb 26 '11 at 6:27
    
IView only defines that MyClass must implement View(), Since MyClass does not have View as it's base class it will not be able to be returned as View. –  Mike Geise Feb 26 '11 at 6:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

MyClass<T> instances are not convertible to View. They are only convertible to IView. If you want to inherit from View class, you should just do that. Implementing a similarly named interface doesn't magically cause the class to inherit from the base type you need:

public class MyClass<T> : View { ... }
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I would add..even if View implements IView –  Luis Feb 26 '11 at 6:36

Any of these will work.

public class MyClass<T>:  IView
{
    public IView View()
    {
        return this;
    }   
}

Or

public class MyClass<T>:  IView
{
    public MyClass<T> View()
    {
        return this;
    }   
}

MyClass is not a View and cannot be returned as one as you try to do.

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Please try this:

public class MyClass<T>:  IView
{
        public View View()
        {
            return (MyClass<T>) this;
        }   
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please try indenting your code when you post answers. You can either indent each line with 4 spaces manually, or select the entire block and press the {} button on the toolbar. –  Cody Gray Feb 26 '11 at 6:31
1  
-1 because you're showing what seems like a random code experiment without explaining why this should work. Why have you decided to change MyClass<T> to MyClass? (UPDATE: Never mind that question. Your answer was updated in the meantime.) Why have you added an explicit cast to MyClass when the return type is View? etc. –  stakx Feb 26 '11 at 6:33
    
@stakx: Just for clarification, I didn't actually update the answer, at least not in the sense that I changed any of the code. MyClass<T> was there originally, it just didn't show up because the block wasn't formatted code. –  Cody Gray Feb 26 '11 at 7:09

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