Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code (doesn't "work" correctly) but compiles in VS 2010 but doesn't won't to compile in GCC 4.5.1

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>//not necessary second > should skip like brackets

using namespace std;

template<class ForwardIterator>
void iterator_swap(ForwardIterator& left,ForwardIterator& right)
{
    typename ForwardIterator::value_type tmp = *left;
    *left = *right;
    *right = tmp;
}

template<class T>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, const std::vector<T>& obj)
{
   typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator beg = obj.cbegin();
   typename std::vector<T>::const_iterator end = obj.cend();
    while (beg != end)
    {
        out << *beg << '\n';
        ++beg;
    }
    return out;
}

int main()
{
    vector<unsigned> v_1;
    for (vector<unsigned>::size_type i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    {
        v_1.push_back(i);
    }
    vector<unsigned> v_2;
    for (vector<unsigned>::size_type i = 0; i < 10; ++i)
    {
        v_2.push_back(i*10);
    }
    cout << "v_1:\n" << v_1;
    cout << "v_2:\n" << v_2;
    iterator_swap(v_1.begin(),v_2.begin());
    cout << "After swap:\n";
    cout << "v_1:\n" << v_1;
    cout << "v_2:\n" << v_2;
    return 0;
}

In GCC I'm getting following err msg:

E:\CodeBlocks\Iter_swap\main.cpp|41|error: 
     invalid initialization of non-const reference of type     
       '__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<unsigned int*, std::vector<unsigned int, 
           std::allocator<unsigned int> > >&' from a temporary of type 
       '__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<unsigned int*, std::vector<unsigned int, 
           std::allocator<unsigned int> > >'|

So which team is right? VS or GCC?

share|improve this question
2  
Why are you passing iterators by reference if you don't intend to modify them? –  fredoverflow Feb 26 '11 at 12:28
    
+1 The question is worded terribly, but you've stumbled on one of my pet peeves with GCC, and a common problem I'm sure. –  Matt Joiner Feb 28 '11 at 1:55

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The problem is here:

iterator_swap(v_1.begin(),v_2.begin());

You're passing a temporary (returned from the begin() functions) to a function that accepts two non-const references. Standard C++ prohibits temporaries from binding to non-const references. (Standard C++ does allow temporaries to bind to const references, however.)

Both GCC and VC++ (versions 2005 and later) "knows" that you can't bind temporaries to non-const references according to standard C++. So they're both "right" per se. However, Visual C++ implements a non-standard extension that allows temporaries to bind to non-const references in the manner you have in your code snippet.

To catch things like this, I highly recommend that you compile your code with level 4 warnings enabled (/W4) and treat warnings as errors (/WX) on Visual C++. It will catch errors like these.

share|improve this answer
6  
+1 So really, the answer is "Neither, you're wrong for not compiling with /W4". –  Cody Gray Feb 26 '11 at 11:42
5  
@There: It is an error to not compile with /W4 and then ask here what is wrong, when the level 4 warning tells you just that. –  Bo Persson Feb 26 '11 at 13:09
3  
@There: It becomes an error not to compile with all warning enabled when you find yourself asking questions like this. Evidence you're probably trying to outsmart the compiler or writing way too much code that tests the edge cases of the spec. I may be just a simple pundit, but I'm one that compiles with /W4. –  Cody Gray Feb 26 '11 at 13:56
6  
@There is nothing we can do: The documentation for /W4 states that "For a new project, it may be best to use /W4 in all compilations". It's not a compilation error to not compile at the highest warning level per se, but it is recommended so that you can catch as many errors as the compiler can at compile time. And catching errors at compile time rather than runtime is always a good thing. –  In silico Feb 26 '11 at 14:42
3  
@There is nothing we can do: if we really want to be smart-asses about it, then as far as the standard is concerned it's an "error" to compile C++ with a non-conforming compiler. It's naturally an error to expect two non-conforming compilers to do the same thing, or to suggest that if they don't then one of them must be "wrong". Both GCC and MSVC are deliberately non-conforming by default. If you put them into their respective strict modes, then they're conforming as far as they've managed so far, limited by the ingenuity of their respective authors. –  Steve Jessop Feb 26 '11 at 17:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.